Posts tagged ‘Unpaged’

The Road to Epoli

Since I can’t draw, in honor of Inktober I searched out a graphic novel to fit each daily theme presented. Now that October is over, I finally have a chance to catch up on my blogging. Here’s my submission for Oct. 22nd’s theme: trail.

Road to Epoli.jpgTitle: The Road to Epoli
Series: Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo (#1)
Authors: Ben Costa & James Parks
Illustrator: Ben Costa
ISBN: 9780399556135
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2017.

Rickety Stitch is a revived skeleton. Although like most of his kind he has no physical brain, his personality pegs him as an anomaly. Working several dead end jobs with his friend The Goo gets him nowhere, as Stitch strums on his lute, trying to capture the song that haunts his dreams. En route, The Goo gets captured and Stitch gets pressed into service of capturing a gnome for a giant ogre-spawn as the only way to rescue his friend. With the help of an imp with questionable motives and morals, a naive gnome, and a no-nonsense unicorn, Stitch discovers that this might be the first step of an epic story, one he will no doubt be singing about when it finally ends.

The vibrant colors used in the illustrations remind me of Princeless or Nimona, inevitably appealing to a broad teen audience. I also feel like this might provide an introduction to the idea of D&D, if only because it feels like multiple campaigns might be in the works, and there are plenty of incidents where readers might questions motives and actions of the characters. Will he or won’t he? The humor inside the story also appears to be aimed at older audiences, as Rickety Stitch is continuously seen drinking in taverns, complaining about job politics, and waxing existentially about his identity and purpose. Whether being stabbed or scorched, Rickety Stitch seems immortal in his ability to avoid any permanent damage. By the end of the book, the plot seems to have been one long set-up for future tales, as Stitch is still struggling to remember the song that plagues his dreams and seems no closer to his vaguely determined destination, although he does finally receive a map for guidance. The characters are more memorable than the story, and I’d be curious to see how that translates for future installments. I feel this isn’t the last we’ve seen of Rickety or The Goo.

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The Monsters’ Monster

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Monsters' Monster.jpgTitle: The Monsters’ Monster
Author/Illustrator: Patrick McDonnell
ISBN: 9780316045476
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc., c2012.

Together they would make a MONSTER monster. The biggest, baddest monster EVER!

Grouch, Grump, Gloom ‘n’ Doom are monsters that live in “a dark monster castle, high atop a dark monster mountain, overlooking a monster-fearing village.” To settle an argument over who was the biggest, baddest monster, instead of choosing among themselves they decide to pool their ideas and resources and build one. Monster is the result of this teamwork, obviously drawing inspiration from the 1931 classic movie Frankenstein. But Monster is neither big nor bad, and the original trio/quartet (Gloom ‘n’ Doom are two heads on one body) are sorely disappointed. Obviously standing out with his green head and oversized body and his less violent attitude as compared to the other primarily white and orange-brown creatures, Monster has by the end won them over to his way of thinking. With frenetic and funny word use, it’s a great read-aloud to share this Halloween for kids of all ages.

Cockatoo, Too and Toucans, Too

Cockatoo Too.jpgTitle: Cockatoo, Too
Author/Illustrator: Bethanie Deeney Murguia
ISBN: 9781499801026
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Little Bee Books, an imprint of Bonnier Publishing Group, c2016.

 

 

 

Toucans Too.jpg

 

 

 

 

Title: Toucans, Too
Author/Illustrator: Bethanie Deeney Murguia
ISBN: 9781499804218
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Little Bee Books, an imprint of Bonnier Publishing, c2017.

A pair or two of two cockatoos, two toucans, and in the end of the second book two gnus dance to their own tune of homophone words and phrases. Tutus, cans of stew, and canoes play a role in this wonderful wordplay, and cuckoos and owls (“WHO?”) make an appearance. The author’s bio mentions a fascination with Seuss at a young age, and that inspiration is evident in the fun. While the story isn’t action packed and younger children might be slightly confused, elementary aged children learning rhymes and word sounds might enjoy hearing it read aloud, if only for the silliness. I’m no art expert, but I’m pretty sure the illustrations are water color and ink. They portray a vibrant forest background, and overlaying the words on a generous white footer allows for easy visibility and readability. Tata you two toucans and cockatoos, until hopefully a third showing.

Whobert Whover, Owl Detective

Whobert Whover.jpgTitle: Whobert Wover, Owl Detective
Author: Jason Gallaher
Illustrator: Jess Pauwels
ISBN: 9781481462716
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, c2017.

Whobert Whover, owl detective, is patrolling the forest when he sees Perry the possum dead on the ground. Or is he? Astute readers will see Perry’s eyes open during Whobert’s examination of Perry and interrogation of nearby animals. The culprit of his feigned demise is someone Whobert would never expect as he jumps from one false conclusion to another with little or no evidence. Brightly colored illustrations dedicate a single color to each animal. I wish the jaunty clothing seen on the cover was included in the story. Perry’s final reaction and Whobert’s continued cluelessness seems overly dramatic, perfect for the story time crowd.

Imagine That

Imagine That.jpgTitle: Imagine That
Author/Illustrator: Yasmeen Ismail
ISBN: 9781681193625
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Bloomsbury Children’s Books, c2017 (US edition), originally published in Great Britain in 2016 by Bloomsbury Publishing Pic

Lila’s mother repeatedly asks her what she is doing, and consistently receives the response “Nothing”. Her actions though are far from ordinary, as in her imagination she is off wrestling with an octopus, performing in a circus, scaling a tower Godzilla style. Sometimes little snippets of reality in the form of her mitten minders leach into her imaginings, but not always. Her imaginings are relayed in rhyme, either couplets or alternating rhymes, and that inconsistency might call for practice before reading aloud. Although Grandpa and Mom ask Lila the same type of questions, Lila only invites Grandpa into her imaginative play, which makes me feel bad for Lila’s mother whose frustrations seem to grow with every interaction with her daughter. A strangely abrupt and didactic conclusion does not do the story any favors. I seem to be in a minority as it receives rave reviews elsewhere online, but I felt that there are other, more imaginative books about imagination available.

Meditate With Me

Meditate with Me.jpgTitle: Meditate With Me: A Step-By-Step Mindfulness Journey
Author: Mariam Gates
Illustrator: Margarita Surnaite
ISBN: 9780399186615
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, c2017.

 

Imagine a jar full of water and glitter in any colors you choose. […]
Your mind is like that glass jar, with shiny thoughts and feelings zooming this way and that.
But you can use your breath and body to set that busy mind down flat.
Gently, just like that. Swish!

With little introduction, the book leads children through a short meditation. Five animals (a rabbit and elephant who are clothed as females, a cat and bear shown as male, and a pig of indeterminate gender) act out the instructions presented. The narrative is uneven, sometimes in labored rhymes (“Now notice your breath, / in and out through your nose / Is the air cool? Is it warm? / Can you feel in your body where it goes?”), other times in straight prose. The drawings are bright, colorful, engaging, and uncluttered, although reading it while the text encourages students to close their eyes might prove counterproductive. The jar of glitter imagery and the encouragement to be still and quiet in order to listen and identify how you feel and what you hear is well suited for the age, but hardly groundbreaking as they are common in the practice. A summarizing “Four Easy Steps to Meditate with Me” neglects any mention of emotional awareness, which the book spends several pages exploring “What does happy feel like in your body? Make a happy face.” Possibly read through, have a discussion, and then adults could use only the words to guide students through their own efforts. A well-meaning introduction to the idea of meditation, but children might need prompting to picking-up the picture book and the practice.

Bubble Trouble

Bubble Trouble.jpgTitle: Bubble Trouble
Author: Margaret Mahy
Illustrator: Polly Dunbar
ISBN: 9780547074214
Page: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, c2008.

Little Mabel blew a bubble, and it cause a lot of trouble. . .
Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way.

With those lines, we’re off on a rollicking adventure of a baby bounding and bouncing all over town, with half the town’s residents taking up the chase. Be prepared for tongue twisters and oral acrobatics as the lines’ frenetic pace seems to gain steam like a runaway train (or a runaway bubble baby as the case may be). Utilizing alternate rhyme, alliteration, consonance, and assonance this would be a great introduction to a classroom unit on story telling through poetry. I couldn’t believe I hadn’t previously blogged this already, as I’ve been using it for years, primarily with the older audiences considering the length and vocabulary. It’s ideal for outreach visits to summer camps where the children are older, and they are amused and delighted by the absurdity and my efforts to read it at an ever increasing speed. The illustrations are a quirky combination of collage and watercolors, with the impacted family portrayed in matching red hair and patterns utilized for almost every article of clothing. While the audience may be aghast at the account’s antics, baby is for the most part blissful throughout the whole book. Delightful in every way.

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