Posts tagged ‘Unpaged’

Bubble Trouble

Bubble Trouble.jpgTitle: Bubble Trouble
Author: Margaret Mahy
Illustrator: Polly Dunbar
ISBN: 9780547074214
Page: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, c2008.

Little Mabel blew a bubble, and it cause a lot of trouble. . .
Such a lot of bubble trouble in a bibble-bobble way.

With those lines, we’re off on a rollicking adventure of a baby bounding and bouncing all over town, with half the town’s residents taking up the chase. Be prepared for tongue twisters and oral acrobatics as the lines’ frenetic pace seems to gain steam like a runaway train (or a runaway bubble baby as the case may be). Utilizing alternate rhyme, alliteration, consonance, and assonance this would be a great introduction to a classroom unit on story telling through poetry. I couldn’t believe I hadn’t previously blogged this already, as I’ve been using it for years, primarily with the older audiences considering the length and vocabulary. It’s ideal for outreach visits to summer camps where the children are older, and they are amused and delighted by the absurdity and my efforts to read it at an ever increasing speed. The illustrations are a quirky combination of collage and watercolors, with the impacted family portrayed in matching red hair and patterns utilized for almost every article of clothing. While the audience may be aghast at the account’s antics, baby is for the most part blissful throughout the whole book. Delightful in every way.

Where is Bear?

Where is Bear.jpgTitle: Where is Bear?
Author/Illustrator: Jonathan Bentley
ISBN: 9780399555930
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Doubleday, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c3026. (Originally published in Australia by Little Hare Books, an imprint of Hardie Grant, in 2016)

Pencil and watercolor illustrations (don’t miss the wallpaper designs in the background) show a little boy searching for Bear, asking the reader over and over if they have seen him. In the background, peeking out behind doors and page margins are furry paws and feet and body parts. The surprise ending (announced on the cover, so is it really a surprise?) proves that maybe our narrator wasn’t as clueless as we all thought. The story seems intentionally vague in the characters’ relationship with each other, with the titles of anxious searcher and soothing caregiver possible for either child or over-sized animal. Blue wash blankets the final scene of a cozy cuddle proving all’s well.

 

Jabari Jumps

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Jabari Jumps.jpgTitle: Jabari Jumps
Author/Illustrator: Gaia Cornwall
ISBN: 9780763678388
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Candlewick Press, c2017.

The diving board was high and maybe a little scary, but Jabari had finished his swimming lessons and passed his swim test, and now he was ready to jump. (unpaged)

Debut author and illustrator Gaia Cornwall writes a rite of passage tale about African-American boy Jabari also doing something for the first time: jumping off the diving board at the public pool. After several false starts, his dad counsels him and Jabari completes his jump. Several aerial perspectives relay the height and anticipation that Jabari must feel as he looks down on the pool, where his father and sister wait in the shallow end. Details stay consistent throughout the story, and close examination of the illustrations allow you can track the movements of the other pool attendees.

The Ring Bearer

Ring Bearer.jpgTitle: The Ring Bearer
Author/Illustrator: Floyd Cooper
ISBN: 9780399167409
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC, c2017.

Jackson has an important job at the wedding, and he’s not sure he can do it. (unpaged)

In a mixed media style that has always reminded me of the pointillist art movement, Floyd Cooper conveys the fears that young Jackson feels in serving as ring bearer at his mother’s wedding. Straightforward text relays the tense moments before the ceremony begins, where un-aged Jackson and soon-to-be-sister Sophie are coached on how to walk down the aisle. Body language shows that this is a loving family and captures lifelike snapshots, such as Jackson riding astride the groom’s shoulders, with Jackson’s hands grasping his head and just missing his eyes. The facial expressions are also striking in their realism, from sheepishness to pride and confidence. Recommended for blended families looking for representation.

Wolf in the Snow

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Wolf in the Snow.jpgTitle: Wolf in the Snow
Author/Illustrator: Matthew Cordell
ISBN: 9781250076366
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: A Feiwel and Friends Book, an Imprint of Macmillan, c2017.

Containing only sound effects like the howl of wolves and the crunch of snow, a girl walking home from school becomes lost. Finding an equally lost wolf cub, the two help each other reunite with their families. The technique used to create the wolves renders them beautifully sleek creatures, with feathered fur and a penetrating, solid gaze. In contrast, the humans are depicted less realistically, with large round eyes and dots of color on pale cheeks the only thing visible behind an over-sized, nondescript red coat. Comparisons to another little red hooded girl are inevitable. A fine book, although nothing groundbreaking. Save for a wintry day read or a fractured fairy tale story time.

Knit Together

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.
Knit Together.jpgTitle: Knit Together
Author/Illustrator: Angela Dominguez
ISBN: 9780803740990
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, published b the Penguin Group, c2015.

The unnamed narrator likes to draw and admires her (single?) mother’s fiber arts creations. After trying her own hand at knitting and failing, they collaborate on a creation they can both use. It’s disappointing that she doesn’t ultimately learn how to knit, but it’s also refreshing in a way that a picture book allows the main character to quit trying at something they are unsuccessful. It doesn’t always work that try try again will eventually yield results. It’s a sweet story well-themed for Mother’s Day sharing with bright illustrations.

The Hueys in the New Sweater

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Hueys in the New Sweater.jpgTitle: The Hueys in the New Sweater
Author/Illustrator: Oliver Jeffers
ISBN: 9780399257674
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., c2012.

The thing about the Hueys . . .
. . . was that they were all the same. (unpaged)

The Hueys, clumped like Minions but with pill shaped bodies and stick arms and legs, all look and act identical. Until Rupert decides to knit himself a sweater, punctuating the black and white illustrations with a spot of orange. His differences are first frowned upon but then everyone mimics him and all become different in the same way. Although younger readers might not get the joke, older readers could appreciate the tongue-in-cheek social commentary about trends and individuality in society, and it might lead to a thought-provoking conversation about what differences that are accepted, admired, and desired in society and which ones are not.

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