Posts tagged ‘Picture Books’

Knit Together

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.
Knit Together.jpgTitle: Knit Together
Author/Illustrator: Angela Dominguez
ISBN: 9780803740990
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, published b the Penguin Group, c2015.

The unnamed narrator likes to draw and admires her (single?) mother’s fiber arts creations. After trying her own hand at knitting and failing, they collaborate on a creation they can both use. It’s disappointing that she doesn’t ultimately learn how to knit, but it’s also refreshing in a way that a picture book allows the main character to quit trying at something they are unsuccessful. It doesn’t always work that try try again will eventually yield results. It’s a sweet story well-themed for Mother’s Day sharing with bright illustrations.

A Greyhound A Groundhog

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Greyhound A Groundhog.jpgTitle: A Greyhound A Groundhog
Author: Emily Jenkins
Illustrator: Chris Appelhans
ISBN: 9780553498066
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2017.

A hound.
A round hound.
A greyhound.
A hog.
A round hog.
A groundhog. (unpaged)

Wordplay is the name of the game in this simply told tongue twister of a story featuring the titular characters romping through a field together and ultimately startling butterflies into the air. Appelhans’ watercolor and pencil illustrations feature minimalist backgrounds that contribute to the charm, with the round beady eyes staring at you from the pages and capturing your attention as the brindled hog and Merle dog enjoy the simple things in life. Made for sharing on a clear spring day, it’s begging to be followed by finding your own dog (or hog) for romping recreation, and a satisfied collapse in a heap, just like the characters.

Parachute

Parachute.jpgTitle: Parachute
Author: Danny Parker
Illustrator: Matt Ottley
ISBN: 9780802854698
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (US), (First published by Little Hare Books an imprint of Hardie Grant Egmont (AU)) c2013.

Toby always wore a parachute.

Toby requires a parachute to accomplish his day-to-day tasks like getting out of bed, brushing his teeth, and playing on the playground, because it allows him to feel safe. When stranded in a treehouse without it, Toby takes it step by step to get to safety, and slowly grows our of requiring his safety net. Minimal text allow the digital graphics to show the reality of the situation alongside how Toby must see things with dizzying perspectives, bringing sympathy and understanding to his fear of heights. Whether it’s a real parachute is up for debate, but the fear is definitely real and the conclusion gives hope that someday readers might also overcome their own fears, whether it is of heights like Toby or of something else. Pair with Leslie Patricelli’s Higher! Higher! for two very different view points.

The Hueys in the New Sweater

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Hueys in the New Sweater.jpgTitle: The Hueys in the New Sweater
Author/Illustrator: Oliver Jeffers
ISBN: 9780399257674
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., c2012.

The thing about the Hueys . . .
. . . was that they were all the same. (unpaged)

The Hueys, clumped like Minions but with pill shaped bodies and stick arms and legs, all look and act identical. Until Rupert decides to knit himself a sweater, punctuating the black and white illustrations with a spot of orange. His differences are first frowned upon but then everyone mimics him and all become different in the same way. Although younger readers might not get the joke, older readers could appreciate the tongue-in-cheek social commentary about trends and individuality in society, and it might lead to a thought-provoking conversation about what differences that are accepted, admired, and desired in society and which ones are not.

Leave Me Alone!

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Leave Me Alone!.jpgTitle: Leave Me Alone!
Author/Illustrator: Vera Brosgol
ISBN: 9781626724419
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishings Holdings Limited Partnership, c2016.

Once there was an old woman.
She lived in a small village in a small house . . .
… with a very big family.

The nameless old woman is simply looking for some peace and quiet in order to finish her knitting for her family before winter arrives. Asserting herself with a shouted “Leave me alone!”  she retreats to the forest, to the mountain, and to some literally out of this world locations in search of solitude. Vocabulary is slightly advanced for this audience (I don’t want to spoil the surprise ending, but pre-reading is a must) but the illustrations convey the meanings. Each locale has its own color scheme, which separates them from each other, but the double page spreads provide reference to how far the woman has gone in her search. Something totally unique and sure to spark conversation. How far and where do you go to be alone? Perfect pairing with Let Me Finish by Minh Lê.

Ned the Knitting Pirate

Ned the Knitting Pirate.jpgTitle: Ned the Knitting Pirate
Author: Diana Murray
Illustrator: Leslie Lammle
ISBN: 9781596438903
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership, c2016.

We’re pirates, we’re pirates, out sailing the sea
So scruffy and scrappy and happy are we.
We’re tougher than gristle and barnacle grit.
We heave, and we ho, and we swab, and we . . .

KNIT! Or at least that’s what Ned does. The other pirates, especially the captain, aren’t so enthusiastic about Ned’s hobby, and orders the needles to be stowed. But Ned’s knitting might be the only things that saves the Rusty Heap from becoming an ocean beast’s feast. Jaunty, rollicking rhymes can be sang as a sea shanty, although the uneven numbering scheme makes a sometimes rough transition from the narration to the song the pirate’s sing, which gets repeated but not verbatim. Readers get an advanced glimpse of the threatening sea monster (resembling if Slimer from Ghostbusters had been crossed with an octopus and a mermaid’s tail) on the title page, along with a fully clothed mermaid (she wears a shirt instead of a bikini top) who seems to be its caretaker. It’s little details like that, along with the anthropomorphic critters scattered throughout the ship and the ever-growing knitting project which matches Ned’s knit, tri-cornered hat, that add whimsy to the story. Keep in your trunk for a new spin on Talk Like a Pirate Day in September.

Two Roaring Press Books about knitting in the same year (the other one being Leave Me Alone, being reviewed tomorrow)! Is this one of those weird trends that pop up on occasion?

Cat Knit

Cat Knit.jpgTitle: Cat Knit
Author/Illustrator: Jacob Grant
ISBN: 9781250051509
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Feiwel and Friends Book, an imprint of Macmillan, c2016.

Cat and Girl had always been good friends.
One day, Girl brought home a colorful new guest.
His name was Yarn.

Purple-furred Cat at first enjoys Yarn’s company, but then Girl “wanted to play with Yarn” and Yarn changes from a round red ball to a sweater for Cat. Cat does not appreciate this change, but when cold weather arrives he learns to accept his friend Yarn’s new form. Cat’s antics mimic the behavior of real cats, and his eyes show all his emotion as he glances with first mild interest, then joy, then anger, and finally reluctant acceptance at Yarn’s appearance and reappearance, although children unfamiliar with the concept of knitting and yarn crafts might need some explanation of exactly what happened. The last laugh is that Cat might have more to get used to than he originally thought. Girl was smart to buy a cat and sofa that matched in color, and digitally colored charcoal and crayon illustrations have a retro feel, with the focus placed solely on Cat.

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