Posts tagged ‘Graphic Novel’

The Sculptor

SculptorTitle: The Sculptor
Author/Illustrator: Scott McCloud
ISBN: 9781596435735
Pages: 496 pages
Publisher/Date: First Second, c2015.
Published: February 3, 2015

“So what if the art thing didn’t work out? Is it really that important?”
“It’s all I have.”
“What would you give for your art, David?”
“I’d give my life.” (32-33)

With those fateful — or maybe fatal — words, David sets the next 200 days in motion. David has spent so many years trying to accomplish his life’s goal of making a name for himself in the art world. But he’s currently a down on his luck sculptor who has no future work prospects, no girlfriend, no family, little money, and will soon be homeless. So he’s spending his last dollars on his birthday getting drunk at a local diner, until two unexpected visitors – one is an angel and the other is death – deeply impact the next six months of his life.

Visually stunning and satisfying. These are the first two words that come to mind after finishing. Scott McCloud literally wrote the book on comic books. This graphic novel proves that not only can he talk the talk, he can also walk the walk. The writing and drawings are equally affecting, and in some cases I paused to not only process the plot but also come up for air as I was immersed in this world. The monochromatic colors change the mood with the flip of a page, with one section using a much darker blue color scheme to convey the dark emotions and some panels and pages being completely devoid of color. Some pages are more traditional in their layout, whereas others change the tone of the narrative by either switching from a white gutter to a black one, and in some cases doing away with the gutter completely. The full-page panoramic shots are eye-catching, but the varied layouts add interest and keep readers engaged. Sometimes they feature detailed street scenes with identifiable individuals in the crowd, other times focus on a single character close-up which draws readers into the dramatic relationships, and that unique final sequence feels like a flip book as it follows one character’s descent.

David, the epitome of a starving artist, just can’t catch a break, at one point claiming he’s cursed, being told it’s just bad luck, and asking “What difference does it make?” His grand goals and aspirations are what continues to drive him. He can’t think small, he can’t be confined by what others in the art world dictates. He needs to succeed in a big way and make a name for himself, which is especially influenced by his having to distinguish himself from an already successful artists with the same name. He has made promises to himself that he refuses to break, which bring morals and character to an otherwise selfish and self-centered persona. In fact, he’s criticized for his impatience and his inability to consider anyone else’s needs, whether it deals with his life personally or professionally. His life of ongoing disappointments make it difficult for him to connect with others, and you see through his few relationships how loyal he is to them, although those friends have long recognized that they can’t count on him to “act normal”. His awkwardness in social situations is stereotypical (think of any geeky, artistic character, in any romantic comedy, and you have David) but if you have a problem with the stereotype don’t blame the artist and it’s also endearing to watch David try to navigate this space.

Meg is beautiful. Her unexpected meeting with David is rooted in today’s culture, but we view things from a previously unseen perspective. She is so full of energy and life, even though as we later learn she has her own scars and past to confront and manage. Her spontaneous, optimistic, romantic heart contrast against David’s more pessimistic mood swings, but David comes to realize that he can’t just take those attitudes for granted. Many have complained that Meg is a foil for David’s character development and she isn’t as developed as she could be. I feel that while this is a valid complaint, we see her primarily from David’s perspective when they are alone together, so I feel like this point of view is justified within the context of the story. Meg’s background is a mystery, sure, but that’s because David is so self-absorbed he doesn’t think to ask and when he does she is reluctant to reveal and let him in, going so far as to warn him not to let her push him away. While David’s attraction to her is fast, Meg holds him at bay until she is sure of her own feelings.

The presentation of Death is interesting, and David’s conversations with him bring to mind questions of death, memory, fame, art, and immortality. Some questions that spring to mind for possible discussion, if I ever get around to using this as a book discussion:

  • Do you continue to “live on” after death when others remember you?
  • Is David’s pursuit of fame on par with the pursuit of immortality?
  • How did events in David’s past influence his current goals? What are his goals, and does David accomplish them by the end of the book?
  • Is art for the sake of the artist or the public?
  • How often do artists intend their symbolism in art, is it found after the completion, or is sometimes a square just a square?
  • What qualifies as art, and who decides between underground and mainstream pieces?
  • On page 217, there is a discussion about rules, and how you “can’t break the rules”. Is this true? What are some of the rules that David tries to break and what are some of the rules he tries to keep?

Although some have called it cliched with the presentation of Meg as a “Manic Pixie Girl” and David as the starving artist ready to do anything to catch a break, this hefty tome is definitely thought-provoking. The plot twists, while somewhat expected, are no less gut-wrenching as we watch these two characters try to navigate this world. Portrayals of frontal nudity cause me some hesitation in handing it to younger teens, but high school students could definitely empathize with David’s struggle to make a name for themselves and garner fame as they pursue their own futures.

Korgi Book Three

Korgi 3 A Hollow BeginningTitle: Korgi Book Three: A Hollow Beginning
Author/Illustrator: Christian Slade
ISBN: 9780329889081
Pages: 112 pages
Publisher/Date: Top Shelf Productions, c2011.

It’s impossible to quote a wordless picture book. If you’ll remember my previous review of the first two books, I predicted that there would be a third book. This one is different than the other two, as there is more violence, which I was somewhat shocked by. The illustrations are still gorgeous, detailed, and expressive, with a flashback sequence set apart by a thicker border around each panel and darker lines composing the drawings. Ivy and her korgi Sprout have discovered a sliver of… something (it resembles a pieces of sharp glass) with a drawing on it. After asking around the village, they visit Wart, the librarian/historian for the town. (Side note, as a librarian, I’m drooling over Wart’s book collection and shelving.) Wart tells a story of where the piece may have come from, but it is almost stolen from the duo until a friend saves the day. Although the very last page seems to be the perfect ending (in a photo-copy-and-frame-that-drawing kind of way), there are still some unresolved plot points that may lead to a fourth book in the series, especially when tying the flashbacks to the current story line.

El Deafo

El DeafoTitle: El Deafo
Author: Cece Bell
Color: David Lasky
ISBN: 9781419710209
Pages: 242 pages
Publisher/Date: Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS, c2014.
Awards: Newbery Honor (2015)

I wake up every morning happy and relieved to be home. I stay close to Mama, no matter where she is. But suddenly, I lose her. Where is she? I call out but she doesn’t answer me! When I finally find her, I know that everything is different. I think she knows it, too. I can’t hear. (11-12)

As a result of meningitis when she was four, Cece spent some time in the hospital. When she got back home, her parents and her realized that there was something wrong. She had become deaf. After being fit with hearing aids, Cece attends a special school to adapt to her lost hearing, but a family move means she leaves behind the welcoming environment. A new school means she needs to adapt to kids not understanding what the hearing aids do and how to react and interact with her.

The idea of portraying the people as bunnies was an inspired choice on the author’s part. Deafness seems more pronounced when exhibited by an animal with such pronounced ears, and that makes real the anxiety that the author feels when trying to hide her defining characteristic. I had a classmate with a similar hearing device that Cece wears and uses in school, and it’s interesting to see the world from that perspective. Cece’s reluctance to learn sign language was surprising to me, but her reasoning makes sense. She is trying so hard to not appear different that she is isolating herself because she can’t change her differences. It’s when she finally embraces her differences and uses them to the class’s advantage (like a super power) that she makes friends. But honestly, I’m glad she made friends like Martha, who didn’t care about her hearing aids, either as a positive super power or a negative disability.

Most of the feelings of acceptance are universal, they are simply amplified by Cece’s difference. Fans of Raina Telgemeier’s Smile and R. J. Palacio’s Wonder will probably enjoy this graphic novel with a similar story line. These books are important to have to teach acceptance to children and share unique perspectives, but some may be turned off by the continued emphasis of the differences and the primary role they play in the plot.

ALA Media Awards 2015

The ALA Media Awards were announced today. The Oscars of the children’s and teen literature world, here’s a break down of some the winners. The complete list can also be found on their website. I hesitate to include all of them because this post would be way too long, but these are the ones I think the majority of the readers have heard of and are interested in learning. But please do check the website, as all of the winners should be considered and I may include the winners of the other awards in a future post.

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:
Newbery Slide 2015

WINNER

“The Crossover,” written by Kwame Alexander

Two Newbery Honor Books also were named:

“El Deafo” by Cece Bell, illustrated by Cece Bell
“Brown Girl Dreaming,” written by Jacqueline Woodson

You’re going to have a sense of de ja vue between the Newbery and Coretta Scott King Author Award, so let’s get that out of the way.Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:
Coretta Scott King Author Slide 2015

WINNER

“Brown Girl Dreaming,” written by Jacqueline Woodson

Three King Author Honor Books were selected:

Kwame Alexander for “The Crossover,”
Marilyn Nelson for “How I Discovered Poetry,”
Kekla Magoon for “How It Went Down,”

I had a weird since of coincidence as well when viewing the winners of the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award. I give you the trio of biographies on female African American artists.

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Slide 2015

WINNER

“Firebird,” illustrated by Christopher Myers and written by Misty Copeland

Two King Illustrator Honor Books were selected:
Christian Robinson for “Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker,” by Patricia Hruby Powell
Frank Morrison for “Little Melba and Her Big Trombone,” by Katheryn Russell-Brown

You’ll see some repeats from the above list to this next list as we move to the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children.
Sibert Slide 2015

WINNER

“The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus,” written by Jen Bryant

Five Sibert Honor Books were named:

“Brown Girl Dreaming,” written by Jacqueline Woodson
“The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia,” written by Candace Fleming (Also recognized as a finalist for YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults)
“Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker,” written by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson
“Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands,” written and illustrated by Katherine Roy
“Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation,” written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh

I don’t think anyone was as surprised by the list for the Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:
Caldecott Slide 2015

WINNER

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend,” written and illustrated by Dan Santat

Six Caldecott Honor Books also were named:

“Nana in the City,” written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo
“The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art,” illustrated by Mary GrandPré and written by Barb Rosenstock
“Sam & Dave Dig a Hole,” illustrated by Jon Klassen and written by Mac Barnett
“Viva Frida,” written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales
“The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus,” illustrated by Melissa Sweet and written by Jen Bryant
“This One Summer,” illustrated by Jillian Tamaki and written by Mariko Tamaki

SIX Honorees! Three picture book biographies! And the most shocking inclusion of all, is a young adult graphic novel!! While I applaud the diversity of the selections and the number of honorees is unprecedented (can anyone prove otherwise), I’m disconcerted at the range of ages that the selections are intended for. I need to gather my thoughts and reread the book before addressing this fully, so stay tuned.

This One Summer was also featured in the list of the Michael L. Printz Award books for excellence in literature written for young adults as an honoree. Am I the only one thinking “WHAT CRAZINESS IS THIS!?!?”
Printz Slide 2015

WINNER

“I’ll Give You the Sun,” written by Jandy Nelson

Four Printz Honor Books also were named:

“And We Stay,” by Jenny Hubbard
“The Carnival at Bray,” by Jessie Ann Foley
“Grasshopper Jungle,” by Andrew Smith
“This One Summer,” by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki

A list that didn’t have a single repeat on any of the other lists was the Odyssey Awards, presented for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States:
Odyssey Slide 2015

WINNER

“H. O. R. S. E. A Game of Basketball and Imagination,” produced by Live Oak Media, is the 2015 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Christopher Myers and narrated by Dion Graham and Christopher Myers.

Three Odyssey Honor Recordings also were selected:

“Five, Six, Seven, Nate!” produced by AUDIOWORKS (Children’s) an imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, Simon & Schuster, Inc., written by Tim Federle, and narrated by Tim Federle;
“The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place,” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, written by Julie Berry, and narrated by Jayne Entwistle;
“A Snicker of Magic,” produced by Scholastic Audiobooks, written by Natalie Lloyd, and narrated by Cassandra Morris.

And since we’ve covered all the other age group specific awards, let’s finish this post with the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book (which in my opinion should just be renamed the Mo Willems Award):
Geisel Slide 2015

WINNER

You Are (Not) Small,” written by Anna Kang and illustrated by Christopher Weyant

Two Geisel Honor Books were named:

Mr. Putter & Tabby Turn the Page,” written by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Arthur Howard
Waiting Is Not Easy!” written and illustrated by Mo Willems

What award or winner most surprised you?

Through the Woods

Each month for my job, I write a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ll be expanding that idea to the blog in a new feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Through the WoodsTitle: Through the Woods
Author/Illustrator: Emily Carroll
ISBN: 9781442465954
Pages: unpaged (208 pages)
Publisher/Date: Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, c2014.

When I was little I used to read before I slept at night. And I read by the light of a lamp clipped to my headboard. Stark white, and bright, I dreaded turning it off. What if I reached out… just past the edge of the bed and SOMETHING, waiting there, GRABBED ME and pulled me down, into the DARK. (introduction)

Less is more in this eerily spooky collection of graphic short stories. Sparse narration and vivid drawings bring the chilling tales to life. There are vague connections to folk tales and fairy tales, such as Little Red Riding Hood, but Disney fans will be severely surprised, and possibly horrified. Each story has its own color palette that is used to the fullest extent, with white space (or in most cases black space) conveying the mood. The attention-grabbing blood red pops out of the page. Read it again to appreciate the striking illustrations, and while they “are rendered in ink and graphite on Bristol board and then digitally colored”, the beginning and end papers left me thinking of relief printing. Definitely recommended, just not for those prone to nightmares. This brings horror to a new high and the stories with open-endings will leave behind feelings of “could this happen to me”.

In Real Life

In Real LifeTitle: In Real Life
Story: Cory Doctorow
Art and Adaptation: Jen Wang
ISBN: 9781596436589
Pages: 175
Publisher/Date: First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership, c2014 (Adapted from a story by Cory Doctorow called “Anda’s Game” first published on Salon.com in 2004)
Published: October 14, 2014

“I’m a gamer and I kick arse. No, seriously. I organize a guild online and I’m looking for a few of you chickens to join me. This is Coarsegold Online, the fastest growing massive multiplayer roleplaying game with over 10 million subscribers worlwide. You might’ve heard of it. This is my avatar. In game, they call me the Lizanator, Queen of the Spacelanes, El Presidente of the Clan Fahrenheit. How many of you girls game? And how many of you play girls? See that’s a tragedy. Practically makes me weep. When I started gaming online there were no women gamers. I was one of the best gamers in the world and I couldn’t even be proud of who I was. It’s different now, but it’s still not perfect. We’re going to change that, chickens, you lot and me. Here’s my offer to the ladies: if you will play as a girl in Coarsegold Online, you will be given probationary memberships in the Clan Farenheit. If you measure up in three months, you’ll be full-fledged members. Who’s in ladies? Who wants to be a girl in-game and out?” (8-10)

With the words of a school visitor, Anda is hooked on the online game Coarsegold. And she makes an impressive start, so much so that she is invited by a fellow clan member to go on some missions. These missions aren’t for game gold though, they are for real world cash. The missions involve hunting down players who are only there to mine gold and then sell it online for real cash, and Anda is getting paid to take out the competition by other gold hunters doing the exact same thing. She thinks it’s to maintain fairness, since other players invest the time and energy and practice to acquire their items and skills themselves rather than paying for them. Then she meets Raymond, one of the gold farmers who gives her a whole new perspective about the real world. Will Anya’s efforts to equalize lead to more trouble in both worlds?

First, Jan Wang’s artwork is STUNNING! The real world is primarily portrayed in hues of olive-green, browns, and oranges, while the virtual world is brightly rendered using reds, yellows, and vibrant blues. By the end of the novel, you can tell Anda’s time in Coarsegold is affecting her because the colors begin to bleed into the real world spreads. The characters are also portrayed in a variety of shapes and races, some less humanoid than others. This novel packs a lot into the tiny size, and it does it without being didactic or patronizing. Anda’s parents’ concerns about her involvement in an online community, the lack of female gamers, the practice of gold farming, working class dynamics, and different cultures trying to relate to each other are all presented in ways that are relevant and necessary for the story. Doctorow addresses most of these ideas in his introduction, urging readers to consider activism and how the internet may aid in activism efforts. “Those risks are not diminished one iota by the net. But the rewards are every bit as sweet.” (xii)

One item that isn’t even mentioned is Anda’s weight, which is so refreshing because although she is on the “bigger” side, it’s not relevant to the main plot and there is no dissatisfaction with her size. It isn’t even a subplot! Based on a short story originally published by Doctorow, Wang took some liberties there, which I think strengthened the focus of the story. Other liberties include shortening the time line, changing the ending slightly, and really focusing on the economic and social aspects of the story. However, whole portions of dialogue were lifted from the original and judging by how much I liked this book, it’s a sure sign that I need to read more of both Jen Wang and Cory Doctorow’s creations. Containing smart, insightful, cultural commentary on a number of issues in an engaging plot, this book will make you think without even realizing it. Give this one to gamers, social activists, feminists, or as an introduction to someone new to the graphic novel genre.

2 The Point Tuesday Explorer: The Lost Islands

Each month for my job, I write a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ll be expanding that idea to the blog in a new feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Explorer Lost IslandsTitle: Explorer: The Lost Islands
Editor: Kazu Kibuishi
Contributors: Jake Parker, Chrystin Garland, Jason Caffoe, Dave Roman and Raina Telgemeier (colorist Braden Lamb), Michel Gagne, Katie and Steven Shanahan (colorists Eric Kim and Selena Dizazzo), and Kazu Kibuishi (colorist Jason Caffoe)
ISBN: 9781419708817
Pages: 127 pages
Publisher/Date: Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS, c2013.

There’s a rabbit with a helpful robot. A young child discovers there is more than you think behind a carnival mask. A teenage boy stranded on a deserted island finds help from a ghost crab. A teenage girl discovers a woman whose life sounds eerily similar to her own. A flying fish rescues her friends from an erupting volcano. A mage in training learns the value of the radio as she tries to hatch a pixie egg. A boat full of fishermen almost becomes fish food. These seven stories all revolve around exploring lost islands and what you might find on their shores and in their waters. A compilation of graphic novelists take turns sharing through vivid colors their interpretations of the theme, some complete and some with open endings leaving readers to wonder what is next in the adventures of the characters.

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