Posts tagged ‘fears’

Parachute

Parachute.jpgTitle: Parachute
Author: Danny Parker
Illustrator: Matt Ottley
ISBN: 9780802854698
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (US), (First published by Little Hare Books an imprint of Hardie Grant Egmont (AU)) c2013.

Toby always wore a parachute.

Toby requires a parachute to accomplish his day-to-day tasks like getting out of bed, brushing his teeth, and playing on the playground, because it allows him to feel safe. When stranded in a treehouse without it, Toby takes it step by step to get to safety, and slowly grows our of requiring his safety net. Minimal text allow the digital graphics to show the reality of the situation alongside how Toby must see things with dizzying perspectives, bringing sympathy and understanding to his fear of heights. Whether it’s a real parachute is up for debate, but the fear is definitely real and the conclusion gives hope that someday readers might also overcome their own fears, whether it is of heights like Toby or of something else. Pair with Leslie Patricelli’s Higher! Higher! for two very different view points.

Quit Calling Me a Monster!

Quit Calling Me a Monster.jpgTitle: Quit Calling Me A Monster
Author: Jory John
Illustrator: Bob Shea
ISBN: 9780385389907
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2016.

Quit calling me a monster!

In this tongue-and-cheek criticism, purple furred Floyd Peterson (who looks like a cousin It with limbs, facial features, and a bad dye job) insists that people refrain from calling him a monster. He’s frustrated that just because he hides under beds, makes noises when sleeping in your closet, and admits “technically” IS a monster, doesn’t mean you can’t call him by his name. Several lessons could be covertly gleaned from the book, including name calling is not nice, words can have different meanings, and confronting/naming your fear can make things less scary. Floyd’s bright purple fur means he pops regardless of what solid colored background illustrator Bob Shea places him on. The choice to give Floyd a snazzy bowler and matching bow-tie certainly makes him less scary than other monsters we could meet, and the roaring and snoring necessary for an enjoyable monster story is included.

Fraidyzoo

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. This one (along with some others) never made it into the blog, so forgive me while I play catch-up.

Fraidyzoo.jpgTitle: Fraidyzoo
Author/Illustrator: Thyra Heder
ISBN: 9781419707766
Pages: 48 Pages
Publisher/Date: Harry N. Abrams, c2013

Although Little T’s excitable older sister is ready to go to the zoo, Little T is not. Remembering she was scared by something there but not remembering what, her family tries to help her identify what frightened her the last time. How do they do this? By designing two dozen different and elaborate animals out of cardboard, recyclable goods, and household items, of course! Read the book once for the story and the surprise ending, then go through the book again to truly appreciate Thyra Heder’s creations, which could serve as inspiration for your own “staycation” to the zoo.

What There is Before There is Anything There

Each month for my job, I write a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ll be expanding that idea to the blog in a new feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

What There Is Before There is Anything There LiniersTitle: What There is Before There is Anything There (originally published as Lo que hay antes de que haya algo)
Author/Illustrator: Liniers
ISBN: 9781554983858
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Original edition c2006 by Pequeno Editor, Buenos Aires, Argentina,
Text and illustrations c2006 by Liniers
English translation copyright c2014 by Elisa Amado, First published in English in Canada and the US in 2014 by Groundwood Books

This enigmatic story features a young boy being put to bed. As soon as the lights are turned off, the ceiling disappears, a varied assortment of silent “they” descend from the sky, and a dark that extends tendrils towards him follows. Racing to his parents’ room, they allow him to crawl into bed with them, where the beings resurface as soon as the parents are asleep and the lights are out. Is this proving that fears are not so easily conquered? All sorts of questions remain unanswered. While definitely strange in their appearance, the creatures (for lack of a better word) seem quite innocuous, although the boy doesn’t stick around to prove one way or the other. Daylight readings are recommended, because children may catch this nightmarish fear from the protagonist.

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