Posts tagged ‘2 the Point Tuesday’

Waiting

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Waiting.jpgTitle: Waiting
Author/Illustrator: Kevin Henkes
ISBN: 9780062368447
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2015.
Awards: Caldecott Honor (2016), Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor (2016), Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Picture Books (2015)

The pastel illustrations are poster worthy in Kevin Henkes newest picture book, and he should sell prints of the wordless portrayals of the change in seasons that are witnessed through the window. Portraying five knick-knack type toys sitting on a window ledge, — an owl, a pig with an umbrella, a bear with a kite, a dog with a sled, and a rabbit with a slinky-style accordion body – each has its own thing that they are waiting for (except the rabbit, who just likes to look out the window). Surprisingly expressive even though their faces only change slightly, the toys come and go, are visited by other items, and finally gain a permanent addition to their group that has its own surprises. Simplistic and stunning, this shows that waiting for something can be worth it, but silent observation can have its own rewards.

Building Our House

 

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. This one (along with some others) never made it into the blog, so forgive me while I play catch-up.

Building Our House.jpgBuilding Our House
Author/Illustrator: Jonathan Bean
ISBN: 9780374380236
Pages: 48 pages
Publisher/Date: Farrar Straus Giroux, c2013

Based on his parent’s experience building their house, Jonathan Bean brings to life the entire construction process. Starting with a blank unbroken field, the family toils and perseveres. Through rain, wind, and snow, they lay the foundation, raise the frame, and add the roof, windows, siding, and insulation, until they can finally move in. Lots of muted colors lend an understated tone, and the illustrations and story combine to bring a warm feeling to your heart. Look for the tiny details (such as a pregnant cat and kids playing with the wheelbarrow) as this family makes a house a home.

Fraidyzoo

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. This one (along with some others) never made it into the blog, so forgive me while I play catch-up.

Fraidyzoo.jpgTitle: Fraidyzoo
Author/Illustrator: Thyra Heder
ISBN: 9781419707766
Pages: 48 Pages
Publisher/Date: Harry N. Abrams, c2013

Although Little T’s excitable older sister is ready to go to the zoo, Little T is not. Remembering she was scared by something there but not remembering what, her family tries to help her identify what frightened her the last time. How do they do this? By designing two dozen different and elaborate animals out of cardboard, recyclable goods, and household items, of course! Read the book once for the story and the surprise ending, then go through the book again to truly appreciate Thyra Heder’s creations, which could serve as inspiration for your own “staycation” to the zoo.

How to Train a Train

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. This one (along with some others) never made it into the blog, so forgive me while I play catch-up.

How to Train a Train.jpgTitle: How to Train a Train
Author: Jason Carter Eaton
Illustrator: John Rocco
ISBN: 9780763663070
Pages: 48 pages
Publisher/Date: Candlewick Press, c2013.

Illustrator John Rocco earned a Caldecott Honor in 2012 for his book Blackout. His detailed pictures shine as he complements Jason Carter Eaton’s instructions on how to catch and train your very own locomotive. Treating the subject like a pet’s guide, readers are informed that “A warm bath can help calm a nervous train… and few trains can resist a good read-aloud.” Featuring all sorts of trains with expressive eyes and mouths made out of the existing train features (think the headlights in the movie Cars), this book is begging to be shared with young and old train enthusiasts.

Fuzzy Mud

Fuzzy Mud.jpgTitle: Fuzzy Mud
Author: Louis Sachar
ISBN: 9780385743785
Pages: 183 pages
Publisher/Date: Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, c2015.

With sudden ferocity, Chad lunged at him. He slugged Marshall in the face, and then in the side of the neck.
Tamaya screamed.
Marshall tried to protect himself, but Chad hit him twice more, then grabbed him by the head and threw him to the ground.
“Leave him alone!” Tamaya shouted.
Chad glared at her. “You’re next, Tamaya,” he said.
Marshall tried to get up, but Chad’s knee caught the side of his head, knocking him back down.
Tamaya didn’t think. She just reacted.
She reached into the fuzzy mud and grabbed a handful of thick and gooey muck. She ran at Chad, and as he turned toward her, she shoved it into his face. (32-33)

Marshall always walks younger neighbor Tamaya home from their prestigious school. In order to avoid a fight with antagonistic new kid Chad, Marshall takes them deep into the neighboring woods, but Chad follows. They escape, although the next day they realize they might have discovered something that impacts not just them but possibly the entire world. Sachar makes it pretty clear that the fuzzy mud is the culprit for all their troubles, especially since the book is titled after the substance. Excerpts from public hearings that take place prior to and after the primary events are lightly interspersed, but they serve more as info dumps and red herrings in building suspense then actually advancing the plot. The happy ending is plausible if a little convenient, but sometimes scientific discoveries happen that way. For younger readers not ready for Hiassen, this might be a good introduction to the eco thriller genre.

Pirate’s Lullaby

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Pirate's LullabyTitle: Pirate’s Lullaby
Author: Marcie Wessels
Illustrator: Tim Bowers
ISBN: 9780375973529
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Doubleday Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, c2015.

”Yo, ho, ho! Me lad, heave ho! It’s time to go to bed,”
Papa Pirate told his first mate, not-so-sleepy Ned.
“But me mates are weighin’ anchor, sailin’ for the Seven Seas!
Can’t I play a little longer? Ten more minutes, please?”

Author Marcie Wessels weaves a surprising amount of pirate lingo into this story of a boy named Ned and his father getting ready for bedtime. With lines ranging from thirteen to fifteen syllables, a sing-song cadence quickly develops and only gets stronger as the story progresses. The rosy-cheeked rascal pulls all the stops with a search for teddy, a drink, and a story are all implored upon by the fast fading Papa pirate, until at last one of them is asleep (hint, it’s not little Ned). Enjoy the equally delightful aquatic themed details in the drawings, like the octopus sippy cup, the peg-legged and eye-patched stuffed animal, and the titles of the books on the bookshelf. You might have your own mutiny on your hands as pint-sized pirates request a second retelling.

Moletown

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

MoletownTitle: Moletown
Author/Illustrator: Torben Kuhlmann
Translator: Andrew Rushton
ISBN: 9780735842083
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: NorthSouth Books Inc., c2015 (originally copyright by NordSud Verlag AG)
Publication Date: October 1, 2015

The story of Moletown began many years ago. One day a mole moved under a lush green meadow. He was alone at first, but not for long. And over time, life underground changed . . .

Kuhlmann’s second foray into publication is more propaganda then inspiring plot. The detailed illustrations from his lovely first work are maintained, drawing upon iconic images such as Ellis Island travelers, the industrial revolution, and corporate America from the change of the century. But readers quickly lose track of that first mole mentioned in quoted narration blocks in these variant vignettes. One picture shows what looks like moles living in tightly compacted lockers, while another shows an office piled high with papers. The last lines of text allude to an environmental agenda, overlaying a dirty and smoky sea of mole hills and machines surrounding one spot of roped off grass with “Many generations later, the moles’ green meadow had completely disappeared. Almost.” A disappointing ending to what feels like a collection of editorialized cartoons. This will not keep the attention of a story time unless they are tired of the Lorax.

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