Posts tagged ‘2 the Point Tuesday’

A Greyhound A Groundhog

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Greyhound A Groundhog.jpgTitle: A Greyhound A Groundhog
Author: Emily Jenkins
Illustrator: Chris Appelhans
ISBN: 9780553498066
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2017.

A hound.
A round hound.
A greyhound.
A hog.
A round hog.
A groundhog. (unpaged)

Wordplay is the name of the game in this simply told tongue twister of a story featuring the titular characters romping through a field together and ultimately startling butterflies into the air. Appelhans’ watercolor and pencil illustrations feature minimalist backgrounds that contribute to the charm, with the round beady eyes staring at you from the pages and capturing your attention as the brindled hog and Merle dog enjoy the simple things in life. Made for sharing on a clear spring day, it’s begging to be followed by finding your own dog (or hog) for romping recreation, and a satisfied collapse in a heap, just like the characters.

The Hueys in the New Sweater

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Hueys in the New Sweater.jpgTitle: The Hueys in the New Sweater
Author/Illustrator: Oliver Jeffers
ISBN: 9780399257674
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., c2012.

The thing about the Hueys . . .
. . . was that they were all the same. (unpaged)

The Hueys, clumped like Minions but with pill shaped bodies and stick arms and legs, all look and act identical. Until Rupert decides to knit himself a sweater, punctuating the black and white illustrations with a spot of orange. His differences are first frowned upon but then everyone mimics him and all become different in the same way. Although younger readers might not get the joke, older readers could appreciate the tongue-in-cheek social commentary about trends and individuality in society, and it might lead to a thought-provoking conversation about what differences that are accepted, admired, and desired in society and which ones are not.

Leave Me Alone!

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Leave Me Alone!.jpgTitle: Leave Me Alone!
Author/Illustrator: Vera Brosgol
ISBN: 9781626724419
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishings Holdings Limited Partnership, c2016.

Once there was an old woman.
She lived in a small village in a small house . . .
… with a very big family.

The nameless old woman is simply looking for some peace and quiet in order to finish her knitting for her family before winter arrives. Asserting herself with a shouted “Leave me alone!”  she retreats to the forest, to the mountain, and to some literally out of this world locations in search of solitude. Vocabulary is slightly advanced for this audience (I don’t want to spoil the surprise ending, but pre-reading is a must) but the illustrations convey the meanings. Each locale has its own color scheme, which separates them from each other, but the double page spreads provide reference to how far the woman has gone in her search. Something totally unique and sure to spark conversation. How far and where do you go to be alone? Perfect pairing with Let Me Finish by Minh Lê.

Hammer and Nails

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Hammer and Nails.jpgTitle: Hammer and Nails
Author: Josh Bledsoe
Illustrator: Jessica Warrick
ISBN: 9781936261369
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Flashlight Press, c2016.

Darcy crumpled up her playdate plans and plopped onto her bed.
Her best friend was sick, and now Darcy’s entire day was ruined.

Father and daughter take turns completing their to-do lists, including mowing the lawn, laundry, dressing up, doing their hair, and *gasp* manicures! Is Darcy’s Daddy man enough for a manicure? Brightly colored illustrations invoke small details, like grass stains and the slowly deteriorating hair styles. Aside from a blurry background wall photo and the too-big heels Darcy clumps around in, her mother is never mentioned in the text. While children will laugh upon seeing stocky Daddy dressed in plaid with a pink tutu, the message is clear that Darcy is loved and dads and daughters can do anything they want.

We Forgot Brock!

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

We Forgot Brock.jpgTitle: We Forgot Brock!
Author/Illustrator: Carter Goodrich
ISBN: 9781442480902
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, c2015.

The weird thing about Philip’s friend Brock, dressed in garb reminiscent of a pirate, is that nobody else can see him and everyone calls him “Philip’s Imaginary Friend.” After a day at the fair, Philip falls asleep and Brock gets left behind. Luckily, a girl named Anne and her own imaginary friend named Princess Sparkle Dust find Brock and bring him home with them. Will Brock and Philip ever find each other again? Watercolor illustrations portray the imaginary friends in childish, crayon like states very different from the rest of the more detailed drawings, although if you look carefully you’ll notice they still cast shadows. The problem is neatly solved and everyone makes a new friend in the end. The story is realistically childlike, down to Philip posting “Lost” flyers, which prove surprisingly effective! A sweet story perfect to share with children who may have their own imaginary friend.

Snowmen at Night

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Snowmen at Night.jpgTitle: Snowmen at Night
Author: Caralyn Buehner
Illustrator: Mark Buehner
ISBN: 0803725507
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, c2002.

One wintry day I made a snowman,
very round and tall.
The next day when I saw him,
he was not the same at all!

His hat had slipped, his arms drooped down,
he really looked a fright–
it made me start to wonder:
What do snowmen do at night? (unpaged)

Simple but bouncy rhymes detail the overnight exploits of snowmen when everyone is asleep, readers learn they sled, skate, drink cold cocoa, and participate in snowball fights among other things. The pictures are almost three-dimensional in places, where you expect the snowball to leap off the page. Upon reading the copyright page, the illustrator alerts readers they can find a cat, rabbit, Santa face, and a T-Rex in “all these wintertime scenes” but they are thoroughly hidden. I had massive difficulty finding them, and occasionally I simply gave up my search, as some of the small seek and finds are the size of your fingernail and hidden in the spindly drawn tree limbs. If reading this after your family makes their own snowman, be prepared to sneak outside to ensure your snowman acts accordingly, as kids will be looking for evidence of the fun it had overnight.

Waiting

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Waiting.jpgTitle: Waiting
Author/Illustrator: Kevin Henkes
ISBN: 9780062368447
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2015.
Awards: Caldecott Honor (2016), Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor (2016), Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Picture Books (2015)

The pastel illustrations are poster worthy in Kevin Henkes newest picture book, and he should sell prints of the wordless portrayals of the change in seasons that are witnessed through the window. Portraying five knick-knack type toys sitting on a window ledge, — an owl, a pig with an umbrella, a bear with a kite, a dog with a sled, and a rabbit with a slinky-style accordion body – each has its own thing that they are waiting for (except the rabbit, who just likes to look out the window). Surprisingly expressive even though their faces only change slightly, the toys come and go, are visited by other items, and finally gain a permanent addition to their group that has its own surprises. Simplistic and stunning, this shows that waiting for something can be worth it, but silent observation can have its own rewards.

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