Posts tagged ‘0-100 pages’

Knit Together

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.
Knit Together.jpgTitle: Knit Together
Author/Illustrator: Angela Dominguez
ISBN: 9780803740990
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, published b the Penguin Group, c2015.

The unnamed narrator likes to draw and admires her (single?) mother’s fiber arts creations. After trying her own hand at knitting and failing, they collaborate on a creation they can both use. It’s disappointing that she doesn’t ultimately learn how to knit, but it’s also refreshing in a way that a picture book allows the main character to quit trying at something they are unsuccessful. It doesn’t always work that try try again will eventually yield results. It’s a sweet story well-themed for Mother’s Day sharing with bright illustrations.

A Greyhound A Groundhog

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Greyhound A Groundhog.jpgTitle: A Greyhound A Groundhog
Author: Emily Jenkins
Illustrator: Chris Appelhans
ISBN: 9780553498066
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2017.

A hound.
A round hound.
A greyhound.
A hog.
A round hog.
A groundhog. (unpaged)

Wordplay is the name of the game in this simply told tongue twister of a story featuring the titular characters romping through a field together and ultimately startling butterflies into the air. Appelhans’ watercolor and pencil illustrations feature minimalist backgrounds that contribute to the charm, with the round beady eyes staring at you from the pages and capturing your attention as the brindled hog and Merle dog enjoy the simple things in life. Made for sharing on a clear spring day, it’s begging to be followed by finding your own dog (or hog) for romping recreation, and a satisfied collapse in a heap, just like the characters.

Jazz Day

Jazz Day.jpgTitle: Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph
Author: Roxane Orgill
Illustrator: Francis Vallejo
ISBN: 9780763669546
Pages: 55 pages
Publisher/Date: Candlewick Press, c2016.

In 1958, Art Kane had a crazy idea. Gather as many jazz musicians as possible in one place for a big black-and-white photograph, like a kind of graduation picture. (ix)

A collection of poems inspired by a famous photo of jazz musicians from almost 60 years ago, I’m unsure how much appeal or interest children will have in picking up this publication. Jazz is not something that is played regularly on the modern radio, and has been relegated to a stereotypical niche markets of listeners, such as NPR donors or college students who swing dance. Learning the stories behind the people featured in the photo are interesting, but not the primary goal of the book, which means you can’t even promote it as a collective biography, even though there are short biographies of a select few participants in the back. It’s good that the original photo was included along with a chart for identification purposes, but including the chart in the back matter might mean some readers will miss it entirely. The illustrations, primarily in sepia tones, seem more successful when focusing on a single person or small group than when trying to squeeze the entire group onto a page. There is little action to propel the story since it’s basically the story of how a photo was taken, and the poems cover vignettes of either the participants’ previous experiences or embellished accounts of the day. While I can recognize and pay homage to the historical significance of the photo, it’s going to be a hard hand sell for anyone who isn’t already interested in the topic.

nonfiction mondayThis review is posted in honor of Nonfiction Monday. Take a look at what everyone else is reading in nonfiction this week.

Parachute

Parachute.jpgTitle: Parachute
Author: Danny Parker
Illustrator: Matt Ottley
ISBN: 9780802854698
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (US), (First published by Little Hare Books an imprint of Hardie Grant Egmont (AU)) c2013.

Toby always wore a parachute.

Toby requires a parachute to accomplish his day-to-day tasks like getting out of bed, brushing his teeth, and playing on the playground, because it allows him to feel safe. When stranded in a treehouse without it, Toby takes it step by step to get to safety, and slowly grows our of requiring his safety net. Minimal text allow the digital graphics to show the reality of the situation alongside how Toby must see things with dizzying perspectives, bringing sympathy and understanding to his fear of heights. Whether it’s a real parachute is up for debate, but the fear is definitely real and the conclusion gives hope that someday readers might also overcome their own fears, whether it is of heights like Toby or of something else. Pair with Leslie Patricelli’s Higher! Higher! for two very different view points.

The Hueys in the New Sweater

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Hueys in the New Sweater.jpgTitle: The Hueys in the New Sweater
Author/Illustrator: Oliver Jeffers
ISBN: 9780399257674
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Philomel Books, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., c2012.

The thing about the Hueys . . .
. . . was that they were all the same. (unpaged)

The Hueys, clumped like Minions but with pill shaped bodies and stick arms and legs, all look and act identical. Until Rupert decides to knit himself a sweater, punctuating the black and white illustrations with a spot of orange. His differences are first frowned upon but then everyone mimics him and all become different in the same way. Although younger readers might not get the joke, older readers could appreciate the tongue-in-cheek social commentary about trends and individuality in society, and it might lead to a thought-provoking conversation about what differences that are accepted, admired, and desired in society and which ones are not.

Fancy Party Gowns

Fancy Party Gowns.jpgTitle: Fancy Party Gowns: The Story of Fashion Designer Ann Cole Lowe
Author: Deborah Blumenthal
Illustrator: Laura Freeman
ISBN: 9781499802399
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: little bee books, a division of Bonnier Publishing, c2017.

Ann thought about what she could do, not what she couldn’t change.
So she sat down and sewed the dresses herself. Then she stood up and ran the business.

Ann Cole Lowe was the designer of Jacqueline Bouvier’s wedding dress when she married future president John F. Kennedy. Primarily covering her role in that momentous event and her career but skimming over her personal life, some of her other designs can be seen in the end papers and cover of the book. Many appear timeless and could grace the award show invitees today. The focus remains squarely on Ann, with most of the illustrations only featuring her face. Although I don’t know what materials were used to make the illustrations, they have a layered quality that pulls readers into the drawing and makes it seem as if you’re standing next to her, watching her struggle and succeed. Pay attention to the scene where she is watching a television in a store front window, and you’ll see her impressively rendered reflection! The repeating refrain quoted above is inspiration for anyone struggling, and also showcases that while her lack of business sense had her floundering financially, Lowe never lost her talent, spirit, and drive to succeed. A forgotten piece of history has been brought to new life.

nonfiction mondayThis review is posted in honor of Nonfiction Monday. Take a look at what everyone else is reading in nonfiction this week.

Geisel Awards 2017

WINNER

We Are Growing!.jpgTitle: We Are Growing
Series: Mo Willems’ Elephant & Piggie Like Reading!
Author/Illustrator: Laurie Keller (and Mo Willems?)
ISBN: 9781484726358
Pages: 53 pages
Publisher/Date: Hyperion Books for Children, an imprint of Disney Book Group, c2016.
Awards: Theodor Geisel Award Winner (2017)

Possibly taking a page from Dr. Seuss’s Bright and Early Book Readers, Mo Willems has created Elephant and Piggie like reading. Maybe it’s because it’s difficult to determine how much Willems contributed to the story within, but I wasn’t impressed. Elephant and Piggie introduce and conclude the story of grass growing. Yep, you read that right. Each of the blades of grass can claim to be the most something, whether it be curliest, tallest, crunchiest, or pointiest… you get the idea. When a lawn mower removes some of their unique attributes, they are all reassured with a page turn and a rather abrupt ending that they will grow again. It’s unfortunate that they all had to be the best at something, although refreshing that not every attribute was physical in nature and that they were cut down to size (quite literally) during the telling and had to deal with their loss of individuality, however temporarily it might be. Obviously a necessity due to Willems’s association, but I had trouble finding the humor, charm, and character that made the originals so enjoyable.

HONORS

Infamous Ratsos.jpgTitle: The Infamous Ratsos
Author: Kara LaReau
Illustrator: Matt Myers
ISBN: 9780763676360
Pages: 59 pages
Publisher/Date: Candlewick Press, c2016.
Awards: Theodor Geisel Award Honor (2017)

The Ratso brothers live in the Big City. They live in this apartment with their father, Big Lou.
“There are two kinds of people in this world,” Big Lou likes to say. “Those who are tough, and those who are soft.” […]
Let’s do something,” Louie says to Ralphie. “Something to make us look tough.” (1-7)

Fifth grader Louie and his brother, third grader Ralphie, want to be tough like their father. Every time they try to be tough — including stealing hats to covering their neighbor’s windows with soap — their actions are mistaken for good deeds. Due to the length of the book, the brothers are basically interchangeable and the supporting cast is barely developed. However, the pranks pulled would make this a unique selection for April Fool’s Day, and are mostly harmless. It’s also an informal introduction to perspective and perception, as the brothers think they are being tough and bad, but everyone else sees them as being kind, generous and helpful. The illustrations reinforced this idea, with the opening page showing the brothers with armfuls of water balloons, and the very last page closing out the story with an image of how those balloons are used. Their father also offers a lesson that “Life is tough enough […]. We might as well try to make it easier for one another, whenever we can.” (55) Classroom connections like these make this a welcome addition.
Go Otto Go.jpgTitle: Go, Otto, Go!
Author/Illustrator: David Milgrim
ISBN: 9781481467247
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Simon Spotlight, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, c2016.
Awards: Theodor Geisel Award Honor (2017)

See Otto go.
Bye-Bye, Otto! (unpaged)

Author and illustrator David Milgrim returns after a decade-long hiatus for a sixth adventure featuring his little robot named Otto. Otto yearns to return to his home among the stars, but the rocket he builds takes him “up, up, up” and then develops a glitch, redirecting him down, left and right, and here and there. Finally depositing him back where he started, Otto realizes that this is his home, surrounded by all his friends. Extremely reminiscent of the old Dick and Jane stories, the repetition of the simple text (only one word has more than one syllable) should encourage beginning readers.

Good Night Owl.jpgTitle: Good Night Owl
Author/Illustrator: Greg Pizzoli
ISBN: 9781484712757
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Disney Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group.
Award: Theodor Geisel Award Honor (2017)

Owl was settling into bed when he heard a noise.

A baby blue owl with a heart-shaped face and pink bathrobe is preparing for bed when hears a “SQUEEK!” (which is never detailed in the text but solely in the pictures). After searching outside, in the cabinet, and under the floorboards. When he eliminates those possibilities, his blame turns to the house itself, tearing down the roof and walls before finally learning the cause of the noise is a mouse, which readers have seen as he hides around the house. What starts as an amusing game escalates quickly, and while the owl doesn’t seem phased by the destruction of his house, you can see by the mouse’s sliding smiles that he at least is getting concerned. Owl though seems content to sleep under the stars (aren’t owls nocturnal?) and even invites the mouse up into his bed to spend the remainder of the night (don’t owls eat mice?). Regardless of what adults might see as inconsistencies, children will love knowing before Owl the cause of the noise, the repetition, the building suspense, and the over the top actions that Owl takes. The pictures include nods to previous works by Pizzoli, and the only reason I didn’t miss the beautiful cross-stitched cover underneath the jacket is because Rotem Moscovich’s work was referenced on the copyright page.

Oops Pounce Quick Run.jpgTitle: Oops Pounce Quick Run!: An Alphabet Caper
Author/Illustrator: Mike Twohy
ISBN: 9780062377005
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2016
Award: Theodor Geisel Award Honor (2017)

Asleep
Ball
Catch
Dog

So starts the adventures of a mouse, who wakes up from his nap when a dog’s ball bounces into its whole in the wall. The dog scrambles, the mouse skitters, and the chase is one through the house until the dog recovers his ball. Cleverly bookended with sleep (Asleep followed by “ZZZZZ”), the story is told primarily in pictures with one alphabetically appropriate word or phrase per page accompanying them. The accompanying background is minimal, with almost no color and the focus is squarely on the participants and the ball. A missed opportunity might have been using “victory” instead of “very cool,” but all of the words are ones children would use and hear in daily conversation.

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