Posts tagged ‘0-100 pages’

Red Hat

Red Hat.jpgTitle: Red Hat
Author/Illustrator: Lita Judge
ISBN: 9781442442320
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, c2013.

Pictures and unconscious inflections tell the story of a group of animals who see an opportunity to claim a hat, and seize it (both the opportunity and the hat). Little does the baby bear, the leader of the group, realize that his plan and the hat are slowly unraveling. With contributions from rabbits,  a raccoon and what looks like a porcupine, the baby bear is soon left with only long piece of yarn. Returning it proves problematic, but the original child seems unfazed, and final page shows that everyone gets their own knitted article of clothing. While reading aloud in a group setting might prove challenging, sharing in a more intimate setting the expressive illustrations, especially with a child who has their own prized piece of needlework, will certainly elicit giggles, but it should really have been turned into an animated short.

Nobody Likes a Goblin

nobody-likes-a-goblinTitle: Nobody Likes a Goblin
Author/Illustrator: Ben Hatke
ISBN: 9781626720817
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: First Second, c2016.

The adventurers took everything.
They took the gold. They took the maps, the books, the gems, and the scrolls.
And they took Skeleton.
So Goblin put on his crown and walked out into the wide world to find his friend. (unpaged)

Ben Hatke’s bright and colorful illustrations are beautiful, but unfortunately the story isn’t as fully realized as the drawings that accompany it. Readers are left with little rationale behind the adventurers’ actions, why nobody likes a goblin, or the goblin’s automatic approval of an unknown becoming their king. I sense influences from other stories (a long-bearded wizard leads a multi-race raiding party and a stolen goose is recovered) but none of the characters are given details that could confirm or deny these allusions. I appreciate the inclusion of a female adventurer and that the damsel in distress wields a sword during her rescue. I loved meeting Hatke at an event this past summer, and bought some of his artwork. This book feels like a collection of loosely related pictures that could have received more support through the narration. Several of my coworkers completely disagree and thoroughly enjoyed the book, so you may find more enjoyment in it than I did.

Monday is Wash Day

Monday is Wash Day.jpgTitle: Monday is Wash Day
Author: MaryAnn Sundby
Illustrator: Tessa Blackham
ISBN: 9780991386666
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Ripple Grove Press, c2016.

Rain or shine, Monday is wash day.

A quiet story of a family’s efforts to keep up with the wash, fans of Little House on the Prairie would greatly enjoy this slice of life story taking place during simpler times. It would also work well as an inter-generational read-aloud, where great-grandparents can discuss with their grandchildren what life was like for them when they were young. The unnamed narrator and her sister Annie (possibly twins) aid their mother and baby brother in washing, rinsing, and hanging to dry the clothes, all without the use of appliances.

The illustrations are stunning show stoppers! With hand-painted, cut paper collages, debut illustrator Blackham brings debut author Sundby’s story to life. Look closely enough and you’ll swear you see shadows being cast by the dog and cat as they scamper across the pages after the girls. The clothes flutter on the line, the rug is rumpled, and it certainly appears that the slats on the house are individual pieces! This was most certainly a labor of love. Tiny little clothes pins are photographed on a suspended line, adding dimension to the endpapers. Your own wash can wait, slow down and savor this story.

Quit Calling Me a Monster!

Quit Calling Me a Monster.jpgTitle: Quit Calling Me A Monster
Author: Jory John
Illustrator: Bob Shea
ISBN: 9780385389907
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, c2016.

Quit calling me a monster!

In this tongue-and-cheek criticism, purple furred Floyd Peterson (who looks like a cousin It with limbs, facial features, and a bad dye job) insists that people refrain from calling him a monster. He’s frustrated that just because he hides under beds, makes noises when sleeping in your closet, and admits “technically” IS a monster, doesn’t mean you can’t call him by his name. Several lessons could be covertly gleaned from the book, including name calling is not nice, words can have different meanings, and confronting/naming your fear can make things less scary. Floyd’s bright purple fur means he pops regardless of what solid colored background illustrator Bob Shea places him on. The choice to give Floyd a snazzy bowler and matching bow-tie certainly makes him less scary than other monsters we could meet, and the roaring and snoring necessary for an enjoyable monster story is included.

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion

Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion.jpgTitle: Little Red and the Very Hungry Lion
Author/Illustrator: Alex T. Smith
ISBN: 9780545914383
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., c2016.

This is Little Red. Today she is going to be gobbled up by a lion.
This is the Lion! (Well, that’s what he thinks is going to happen anyway.)

Little Red’s aunt wakes up covered in spots, so Little Red heads off past a handful of African animals to deliver spot medicine, her frizzy black pigtails bobbing on top of her African-American head. Upon meeting with the lion, Lion races ahead, locks Auntie Rosie in the cupboard, and attempts to fool Little Red. Little Red though is MUCH smarter than her original counterpart, and is “going to teach the naughty Lion a lesson” … by doing his hair, teeth, and changing his clothes? This debut author’s saccharine ending becomes a didactic lesson in manners, which completely undermines any attempt at ferociousness on the lion’s part. The very last page makes a last ditch effort at adding humor to the story, with mixed results. The primarily red and yellow hued illustrations add more humor than the text, with Lion’s mane being braided into multiple strands that pinwheel out of his head and are capped with little bows. In a clever use of page orientation, readers must flip the book sideways to read the text as Little Red peers into the lion’s open jaw. An uneven adaptation of the classic Red Riding Hood tale. If you’re looking for a very hungry creature, stick with Carle’s Caterpillar or Wood’s Big Hungry Bear.

The Golden Compass The Graphic Novel Vol. 1

Golden Compass Graphic Novel 1.jpgTitle: The Golden Compass The Graphic Novel Vol. 1
Original Author: Philip Pullman
Adapted by: Stephane Melchior
Translator: Annie Eaton
Illustrator: Clement Oubrerie (with Philippe Bruno)
ISBN: 9780553523720
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Borzoi Book published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC. c2015. (Originally published by Gallimard Jeunesse, c2014) Adapted from The Golden Compass, c1995.

“Lyra! So that is what they’re teaching you here? Spying!”
“Ouch, that hurts!”
“The wine! It’s poisoned!”
“A spy and a liar. They’ve really done well with your education.”
“I was hiding! I saw! The Master poured powder into the wine.” (unpaged)

Lyra has lived at Jordan College for almost her whole life, and is tired of being supervised by the stuffy professors and scholars who live there. She wants to go on adventures with her uncle, Lord Asriel, whom the head of the school tried to secretly poison on her last visit. Instead, she is whisked away from the dangers of the city, including rampant kidnappers dubbed the Gobblers, by the mysterious Mrs. Coulter. However, Mrs. Coulter has her own agenda, including an association with a board using children to research a mysterious substance called Dust, that multiple groups are racing to understand and control. Heading for an adventure she always wanted but could never anticipate, Lyra is left relying on the help of a group of gyptians and her own skills as she travels to the North, to the land of ice, cold, and not-so-friendly armored polar bears.

I’ve been a big fan of the His Dark Materials trilogy ever since it was first published almost 20 years ago. (Not saying “Man I’m old” prevents me from being old, right?) When I heard they were making it into a graphic novel trilogy, I was excited. I was slightly disappointed to learn that this trilogy of graphic novels is only focusing on the first book, and question the rational behind splitting the original novel in this manner. This first volume leaves off with Lyra’s journey north with the gyptians just beginning, and she still has a long way to travel. The artwork is also not what I expected from a story that deals with fantastical elements and beasts. Muted in tone, with lots of dark blues and dusty orange/reds, the color palette may have been determined by the story’s setting and mood more than the other way around. Lyra’s determination and free-spirited nature is still evident in this portrayal, but quite a few of the more animated facial expressions for her and the other characters strike me as overly exaggerated and at times comical. The number of panels per page (sometimes as many as nine) also necessitates that they are quite small, and so details do not translate well, with the exception being when the artist intentionally makes a panel bigger for emphasis.

The background behind Dust and the deamons has been eliminated almost completely, except for a few quick expository pages and some overheard conversations on Lyra’s part. Readers must pay attention to the illustrations to determine the nature of daemons, including their ability to change shape, the necessity of physical proximity to their humans (I almost typed owners, whoops!) and the ties that bind them to those humans. For readers who enjoy fantasy and the ideas of other worlds, this would be an adequate introduction to the ideas. Make no mistake though, this is a paltry substitute for the real thing, and I’m saddened by the fact that some people won’t be motivated to tackle the original.

Tell Me a Tattoo Story

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Tell Me a Tatoo Story.jpgTitle: Tell Me a Tattoo Story
Author: Alison McGhee
Illustrator: Eliza Wheeler
ISBN: 9781452119373
Pages: Unpaged
Publisher/Date: Chronicle Books LLC, c2016.

You wanna see my tattoos?
Why, little man, you always want to see my tattoos. Here we go then.

Pastel pens and watercolors depict the meanings behind a father’s many tattoos. He tells very short stories (more like explanations) of reading with his mother, meeting and marrying his wife, traveling overseas in the military, and finally one commemorating the birth of his son. Several of the tattoos seen aren’t explained, providing the possibility of readers developing their own story behind the ink. Portraying a rarely depicted portion of the population, it’s refreshing to see an inked father doing dishes instead of the stereotyped selling drugs or getting arrested. A necessary addition to collections, especially those serving less conservative populations.

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