Posts from the ‘2 The Point Tuesday’ Category

Pingo

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Pingo.jpgTitle: Pingo
Author: Brandon Mull
Illustrator: Brandon Dorman
ISBN: 9781606411094
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Shadow Mountain, c2009 Creative Concepts LC

This books is unfortunately not what I expected. Pingo is Chad’s imaginary friend, looking mostly monkey with oversized ears, small horns, and a eerily human face. It’s all fun and games for Chad and Pingo, until Chad has had enough of the teasing and wants to abandon Pingo. As the text states, Pingo’s against the idea and Chad now has “an imaginary enemy” who keeps him up and pulls mean-spirited pranks. When Chad is finally alone in a nursing home setting, he welcomes Pingo back and they resume having adventures together. Personally I’d be trying to get rid of Pingo if he pulled those pranks on me, not welcoming him back. It’s a surprisingly unoriginal story by an author who gave us such a fantastical and well loved world in his Fablehaven series. Maybe that’s why, although there is a sequel, he’s since stuck with the middle grade audience.

The Dog That Nino Didn’t Have

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Dog that Nino Didn't Have.jpgTitle: The Dog That Nino Didn’t Have
Author: Edward van de Vendel
Translator: Laura Watkinson
Illustrator: Anton Van Hertbruggen
ISBN: 9780802854513
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Originally published in Belgium in 2013 under the title Het hondje dat nino niet had by Uitgeverij De Eenhoorn BVBA, c2013.
First published in the United States in 2015 by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

An unusual book that tells the story of Nino’s dog, who happens to be imaginary. You know this initially by Van Hertbruggen’s retro drawings that portray a light-colored dog with dark spots that readers literally see through. Then the text reveals that everyone else has trouble seeing this creature. When Nino finally gets a real dog, it’s different than the one he imagined, but that’s okay because this lonely boy can still find joy in both the real and imaginary creatures he calls friends. The final double-paged spread showcases all these animals watching over Nino as he sleeps. The beautiful pictures help readers decipher the sparse but carefully worded text, and I’m curious to learn what children’s reactions have been. This is not a book to be read quickly, but slowly and reflectively, possibly before bed time.

We Forgot Brock!

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

We Forgot Brock.jpgTitle: We Forgot Brock!
Author/Illustrator: Carter Goodrich
ISBN: 9781442480902
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, c2015.

The weird thing about Philip’s friend Brock, dressed in garb reminiscent of a pirate, is that nobody else can see him and everyone calls him “Philip’s Imaginary Friend.” After a day at the fair, Philip falls asleep and Brock gets left behind. Luckily, a girl named Anne and her own imaginary friend named Princess Sparkle Dust find Brock and bring him home with them. Will Brock and Philip ever find each other again? Watercolor illustrations portray the imaginary friends in childish, crayon like states very different from the rest of the more detailed drawings, although if you look carefully you’ll notice they still cast shadows. The problem is neatly solved and everyone makes a new friend in the end. The story is realistically childlike, down to Philip posting “Lost” flyers, which prove surprisingly effective! A sweet story perfect to share with children who may have their own imaginary friend.

Snowmen at Night

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Snowmen at Night.jpgTitle: Snowmen at Night
Author: Caralyn Buehner
Illustrator: Mark Buehner
ISBN: 0803725507
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Dial Books for Young Readers, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, c2002.

One wintry day I made a snowman,
very round and tall.
The next day when I saw him,
he was not the same at all!

His hat had slipped, his arms drooped down,
he really looked a fright–
it made me start to wonder:
What do snowmen do at night? (unpaged)

Simple but bouncy rhymes detail the overnight exploits of snowmen when everyone is asleep, readers learn they sled, skate, drink cold cocoa, and participate in snowball fights among other things. The pictures are almost three-dimensional in places, where you expect the snowball to leap off the page. Upon reading the copyright page, the illustrator alerts readers they can find a cat, rabbit, Santa face, and a T-Rex in “all these wintertime scenes” but they are thoroughly hidden. I had massive difficulty finding them, and occasionally I simply gave up my search, as some of the small seek and finds are the size of your fingernail and hidden in the spindly drawn tree limbs. If reading this after your family makes their own snowman, be prepared to sneak outside to ensure your snowman acts accordingly, as kids will be looking for evidence of the fun it had overnight.

Waiting

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Waiting.jpgTitle: Waiting
Author/Illustrator: Kevin Henkes
ISBN: 9780062368447
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2015.
Awards: Caldecott Honor (2016), Theodor Seuss Geisel Honor (2016), Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Picture Books (2015)

The pastel illustrations are poster worthy in Kevin Henkes newest picture book, and he should sell prints of the wordless portrayals of the change in seasons that are witnessed through the window. Portraying five knick-knack type toys sitting on a window ledge, — an owl, a pig with an umbrella, a bear with a kite, a dog with a sled, and a rabbit with a slinky-style accordion body – each has its own thing that they are waiting for (except the rabbit, who just likes to look out the window). Surprisingly expressive even though their faces only change slightly, the toys come and go, are visited by other items, and finally gain a permanent addition to their group that has its own surprises. Simplistic and stunning, this shows that waiting for something can be worth it, but silent observation can have its own rewards.

The Sleeper and the Spindle

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Sleeper and the Spindle.jpgTitle: The Sleeper and the Spindle
Author: Neil Gaiman
Illustrator: Chris Riddell
ISBN: 9780062398246
Pages: 69 pages
Publisher/Date: first published in Rag & Bones: New Twists on Timeless Tales, published in 2013 by Little, Brown. c2013, Illustrations c2014. Originally published in the U.K. in 2014 by Bloomsbury. Published in U.S. by HarperCollins Children’s Books, a division of HarperCollins Publishers, c2015.

The smallest dwarf tipped his head to one side. “So, there’s a sleeping woman in a castle, and perhaps a witch or fairy there with her. Why is there also a plague?”
“Over the last year,” said the fat-faced man. “It started in the north, beyond the capital. I heard about if first from travelers coming from Stede, which is near the Forest of Acaire.”
“People fall asleep in the towns,” said the pot-girl. […]
“They fall asleep whatever they are doing, and they do not wake up,” said the sot. “Look at us. We fled the towns to come here. We have brothers and sisters, wives and children, sleeping now in their houses or cowsheds, at their workbenches. All of us.”
“It is moving faster and faster,” […] “Now it covers a mile, perhaps two miles, each day.” (18)

Three dwarfs tunnel under the mountain range in search of a wedding gift for their queen, returning with news of a horrible sleeping sickness plaguing the neighboring lands and heading closer every day. The queen, having previously faced her own sleep spell, postpones the wedding and attempts to break the spell and save both kingdoms. Although this might sound familiar, Neil Gaiman’s twist ending flips the story, and you question who is really being held captive. The queen’s confidence is obvious in both narration and illustration, and is the most welcome adaptation to the traditional tale. Two illustrations specifically catch my eye, the first has the queen standing with the dwarfs ready to embark, and the second is the full-spread gorgeously rendered drawing of the kiss. It doesn’t seem enough though to warrant publishing a previous short story as its own book, but U.S. fans will enjoy Gaiman’s newest import.

Building Our House

 

Each month for a previous job, I wrote a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ve expanded that idea to the blog in a feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. This one (along with some others) never made it into the blog, so forgive me while I play catch-up.

Building Our House.jpgBuilding Our House
Author/Illustrator: Jonathan Bean
ISBN: 9780374380236
Pages: 48 pages
Publisher/Date: Farrar Straus Giroux, c2013

Based on his parent’s experience building their house, Jonathan Bean brings to life the entire construction process. Starting with a blank unbroken field, the family toils and perseveres. Through rain, wind, and snow, they lay the foundation, raise the frame, and add the roof, windows, siding, and insulation, until they can finally move in. Lots of muted colors lend an understated tone, and the illustrations and story combine to bring a warm feeling to your heart. Look for the tiny details (such as a pregnant cat and kids playing with the wheelbarrow) as this family makes a house a home.

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