Wires and Nerve Gone Rogue.jpgTitle: Gone Rogue
Series: Wires and Nerve (#2)
Author: Marissa Meyer
Illustrator: Stephen Gilpin (based on art by Doug Holgate)
ISBN: 9781250078285
Pages: 324 pages
Publisher/Date: A Feiwel and Friends Book, an imprint of Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC, c2018

“So, can we all start by agreeing that there is absolutely no way we are letting Cinder sacrifice herself to this psychopath?”
“No one is agreeing to anything yet.”
“I know you, Cinder, and I know you started planning how to trade your life for theirs the moment you heard about his.”
“That’s not true. I started planning a way to get them back safely.”
“And have you come up with a plan yet that doesn’t involve getting yourself killed?”
“Thorne is right. Steele is trying to lure you into a trap.”
“Yes, OBVIOUSLY this is a trap! But what am I supposed to do? We can’t just ignore him!”
“He has Winter and Jacin!”
“And Wolf.”
“And Tressa…”
“And now he wants the Queen of Luna! Aces, Cinder, Would you think of your own self-preservation for once?” (168-169)

The conclusion to the Wires and Nerve series begins with Wolf considering his future with Scarlett when their farm is surrounded by Steele, the big bad wolf-soldier from the previous graphic novel. He recruits Wolf for his revenge towards Cinder, and after Cinder and her entourage arrives on Earth Steele kidnaps Winter, Jacin, and Tressa. Demanding Cinder in exchange for the hostages and threatening the lives of the Earthen public, the fight is far from over. Iko is tasked with a key part in the final showdown, but can she fulfill her role without tipping off Steele that she might be more than he thinks she is?

Firstly, I was slightly disappointed that we saw almost nothing of Thorne and Jacin in this episode of action. Heck, Jacin gets captured TWICE by the wolf-soldiers, and he’s supposed to be a former Lunar guard for the royal family, implying some fighting prowess even if he did want to become a doctor. Even Kai had some blink and you’ll miss them occurrences where he said the necessary “Yes we’ll have military support” or “I’m your emperor so you must listen to me” dialogue, then receded into the background, not contributing in the final battle scene except to tell Steele he’s lost and to ask Cinder if she was hurt. Cinder was a token character, less so then Kai and the others because we saw her navigating the political side of things on both Earth and Luna. It was emphasized repeatedly that Steele was after her for what she represented and not because of who she was, which also lent to the feeling that she was being typecast, although the fought it admirably by arguing again and again that she was nothing like the previous rulers. The few romantic scenes of her and Kai together will satisfy fans of the series (like myself). That was also probably the reason for Scarlett and Wolf’s scenes together, although seeing Wolf stumble over his obviously more submissive and overprotective nature towards Scarlet’s alpha role was a tender moment in an otherwise tense political thriller of double crosses.

The cast was there, and they served their purpose when called upon in a fight, but the main focus was Iko and Liam Kinney, which on the one hand disappoints me but also satisfies me that Iko got her opportunity to shine in the spotlight. I enjoyed the evolution of Iko and Kinney’s relationship because it felt natural. Besides a subtle nod to increased heart rate, there is nothing overtly romantic, which I had worried about it becoming after reading the first one. The story line as a whole seemed to emphasize Iko’s humanity, even though she was an android, and Kinney’s ultimate acceptance that there is more to Iko then wires and circuitry. We get glimpses of Iko’s original programming through some files that Cress recovers, but the underlying question of nature versus nurture persists through much of the story. Iko’s quirks have always been accepted by her friends and previously people who didn’t appreciate them were cast as outsiders. When she gets paired with Kinney, this is the first time that Iko has to continually justify and understand her existence. I like to think that they become really good friends due to this increased self-awareness, both of themselves and their assumptions towards the other person.

A satisfying and quick read that closes out the series that ties up the loose ends for the legion of fans. I got to hear the characters in the audiobooks, and now we get to actually “see” the characters in the graphic novels. I’m sad to see it end, but I think it’s a good place to stop and appreciate the format change.

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