Tetris The Games People Play.jpgTitle: Tetris: The Games People Play
Author/Illustrator: Box Brown
ISBN: 9781626723153
Pages: 253 pages
Publisher/Date: First Second, c2016

Alexey believed that games were the perfect confluence of humanity and technology. Games model the human experience, not just physically but mentally and emotionally. Puzzles are metaphors for thoughts. Games aren’t just an escape. Puzzles reflect society. Games reflect patterns of thinking. Emotions. Games can model consciousness. Games are facets of humanity working together. There is a challenge. A reward, discovery, frustration, closure. (67-69)

An unscheduled surge of interest seems to have arisen regarding the game Tetris, as this book and The Tetris Effect: The Game That Hypnotized the World by Dan Ackerman have been published in the last year detailing the history of the game. It’s not a major anniversary year for the game, first released back in 1984, which seems to place this fluke as purely coincidence. With neon yellow, black, and white illustrations, Brown begins with game creator Alexey Pajitnov, teleports readers back in time to the cave man to cover a very brief evolution of the game, then focuses in on the history of Nintendo before finally returning to the main story. It takes the first hundred pages to cover the creation of the game, and readers are fleetingly introduced to a number of key players. By the time readers realize this though, they have already forgotten most of the names and identities as rights to the game are sold and transferred by multiple companies, some owned by the same people. It’s a shell game of international proportions, involving bidding wars and Soviet subterfuge. It would have been extremely helpful to have a graphic at some point in the book that related the people involved to each other and that could be referred to throughout the reading. There are few details in terms of how much money was involved, the specifics of the contracts, or the timeline, which leaves the whole account reminiscent of a person watching an unfamiliar sport: all the characters are there, but you wonder just who you are supposed to be hoping to win.

Too convoluted in its telling with very few details make this an unmemorable read. Unless you have a high interest or familiarity with the business workings of video games in the 1980s, most readers will be unable to sufficiently summarize what they read or what went down. I don’t feel I came away with any additional knowledge of the creation of the game Tetris after reading this book then I had prior to starting the book.

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