This week, in honor of World Space Week, we’ve got reviews featuring space, in all it’s many forms. Today, I’m reviewing a picture where a boy visits the moon in search of a lost pet.

Space Boy and His DogTitle: Space Boy and His Dog
Author: Dian Curtis Regan
Illustrator: Robert Neubecker
ISBN: 9781590789551
Pages: unpaged
Publication/Date: Boyds Mill Press, an Imprint of Highlights, c2015.

Niko and his copilot search for their next mission.

“I’ll bet that cat is lost on the moon,” Niko says.
“Start the engines, Radar. We will find it!”(unpaged)

Niko, his dog Tag, and his copilot Radar pilot their spaceship, which is usually and understandably parked in his parent’s backyard, to the moon to look for a lost cat. When they arrive, Niko realizes his sister Posh, who is “not in this story”, has stowed away. When Posh finds the cat and claims it as her own, Niko retaliates by leaving her behind. Will Posh have to find her own ride home, or will Niko realize the error in his ways and rescue his sister?

Neubecker’s illustrations ground the story as pure fantasy, starting and finishing things off on Planet Home (Earth). We see the reality of the space craft before they even enter orbit, but we are just as easily transported into space along with Nico and his crew, with visually contrasting effects such as the moon’s white surface against the starry black sky, and Posh’s red hair and spacesuit distinctly set apart from Nico’s blue hair and spacesuit. Regan also has playful asides alluding to the imaginary nature of this journey, especially when “Tag refuses to stay in the copilot seat with Radar” and we see the dog jumping out of the window mid-flight. They both invoke the fickle friendship that can be found when siblings play together, even when they don’t necessarily want to, and siblings will relate best to this story.

UPDATE: I just read this for a story time for older kids (4-8 years old) and while the parents got it, I’m not so sure about the younger kids. I prefaced the space journey with pointing out the pretend elements, because I thought it might go over some kids heads. I think I was right in that assumption and that this might be better suited for a one on one where the kids can really focus on the pictures and explore the imaginary aspects of the pictures and properly ponder how Posh “gets back” to Earth. That being said, it’s still a cute story.

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