WINNER

You Are Not SmallTitle: You Are (Not) Small
Author: Anna Kang
Illustrator: Christopher Weyant
ISBN: 9781477847725
Pages: unpaged
Publication/Date: Two Lions, c2014.

Sometimes a book comes along that is so simple, so universal, and so utterly charming that you look at wondering “Why didn’t I ever write this?” Two fuzzy creatures (they look like bears to me) meet and “argue” over whether or not they are small or big. That’s it. That is the entire book, with some newcomers towards the end of the book proving that it’s all a matter of perspective. Bright colors, lots of white space, simple language, and minimalist drawings all place the focus squarely on the building debate. The back cover predicts a sequel, and if it becomes a series I can predict lots of fans. No complaints here.

HONORS

Mr. Putter and Tabby Turn the PageTitle: Mr. Putter & Tabby Turn the Page
Author: Cynthia Rylant
Illustrator: Arthur Howard
ISBN: 9780152060633
Pages: unpaged
Publisher/Date: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, c2014.

This wasn’t my favorite of the titles on the list, but I read so few easy readers on a regular basis that maybe I’m loosing a grasp of what makes a good one. It’s a slight story where Mr. Putter and Tabby are joined by Mrs. Teaberry and Zeke in a “Read Aloud to Your Pets” program at their library. Mr. Putter and Mrs. Teaberry display good habits, such as pre-reading the books before the event, reading with “gusto”, and showing the pictures. It was a nice touch that Zeke provides the sound effects for the story Mrs. Teaberry chooses to read. Tabby seems like a nice cat, and this is a nice story. Not especially memorable in my opinion, but fans of the series will enjoy.

Waiting is Not EasyTitle: Waiting Is Not Easy!
Author/Illustrator: Mo Willems
ISBN: 9781423199571
Pages: 57 pages
Publisher/Date: Hyperion Books for Children, an imprint of Disney Book Group, c2014.

I joked with a coworker that the Geisel Awards should be renamed the Willems Award. Out of 22 books, seven (including this one) have been recognized in some way by the Geisel committee time after time after time. While the interactions between Elephant and Piggie are sounding a little repetitive to me, Willems throws a curve ball to readers with the final two pages of graphics. Subtle shading and color change show the passage of time, as Gerald is forced to wait for Piggie’s surprise, which Piggie has no difficulty waiting for since he knows what it is and when it will arrive. I was struck by what could be a discrepancy in Gerald’s coloring in one of the double page spreads. I believe it was page 40-41 or 42-43, but I don’t have the book in front of me and if I’m the only one who questions it then maybe it’s just my copy of the book. Willems has not lost his ability with self-explanatory expressions, and the dialogue is just begging to be read aloud.

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