Posts tagged ‘150-199 pages’

2 the Point Tuesday Winter Sky

Each month for my job, I write a maximum 150 word review of a new book that came into the library during the month. I’ll be expanding that idea to the blog in a new feature I’m calling To the Point Tuesdays. If you want to play along, just post a link in the comments and I’ll add them to the post.

Winter SkyTitle: Winter Sky
Author: Patricia Reilly Giff
Narrator: Arielle Sitrick
ISBN: 9780804121422 (audiobook), 9780375838927 (hardcover)
Pages: 152 pages
Discs/CDs: 2 hours, 51 minutes, 3 CDs
Publisher/Date: Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, c2014.
Book Publisher/Date: Wendy Lamb Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, c2014.

Something was moving across the stage!
She leaned closer. That terrible dog–
How had he gotten in there?
He ran back and forth across the stage, almost as if he didn’t know how to get down.
And then she saw the curl of smoke. One of the long curtains was on fire. She dropped the cookies and reached into her pocket for her cell phone. But it was on her dresser, forgotten at home.
The dog was barking now, howling. (38)

Siria, named after the star Sirius, fears for her firefighter father every time she hears the sirens. So during the night, she sneaks out and chases the trucks, watching over him until she knows he is safe. She worries about the increasing frequency, and dreads there is an arsonist on the loose, starting fires for fun. Clues point to an unlikely suspect, and Siria debates whether to turn him in. Narrator Arielle Sitrick maintains Siria’s innocence but conveys her readiness to grow up and take on responsibilities. Newbery Honor-winning author Patricia Reilly Giff provides a heartwarming tale of community and family bonds amid a cold winter backdrop as fire and ice literally collide.

City of Light, City of Dark

City of Light, City of DarkTitle: City of Light, City of Dark
Author: Avi
Illustrator: Brian Floca
ISBN: 97805311068007
Pages: 192 pages
Publisher/Date: Orchard Books, c1993.

People! The land you wish to build on belongs to us, the Kurbs. Still, we are willing to lend you this island as well as our power so you may have the light and warmth you humans require. But there is a price. Each year you must enact a ritual to show you acknowledge that this island remains ours and is governed by our rules. If you fail to perform this ritual-be warned!-the consequences for you will be dire! (8)

Before people had arrived in New York, the Kurbs controlled the lightness and darkness. When people landed on the island, the Kurbs agreed to hide the power somewhere on the island and give the people six months to find it as the land progressively got colder and darker. If it wasn’t returned noon on December 21st, it would be plunged into darkness, but if it was returned it would gradually get lighter and warmer until it was hidden again on June 21st. One woman needs to find the power and return it to the Kurbs, but a greedy blind man, his reluctant assistant, and a young girl and her friend are all searching for it too for very different reasons. Who will find it first?

This is Avi’s version of the Persephone myth, adapted for modern-day New York. I liked the concept, but with my love of Avi’s stories, I was surprised at the narration, which seemed rush and disjointed. The book starts as a mixture of text and graphic novel panels, and then eventually transitions to only graphic novel format. There is too much plot time between the background setting flashback in the beginning and then the bulk of the story. It took him that long to track down the token… Really? Maybe other reviewers are right and it would have been better as a textual novel, as large amounts of the plot are layer out in stilted, expository dialogue.

With Floca’s recent Caldecott Award win, and repeated recognition by the Sibert committee, I was surprised by this first effort at illustrating a novel. Maybe he should stick with the picture book format and continue to color his drawings. I expected more of the sweeping skyline that we see on the cover of the original publication, but the black and white renderings found in the interior seemed rushed, vague, and not detailed. On page 35, he actually draws arrows to guide readers from panel to panel, which seemed unnecessary and awkward. All told, it would be a nice thing to provide readers who are interested in stories influenced by mythology, but it is not the best work of either the author or illustrator.

Wonderland

WonderlandTitle: Wonderland
Author: Tommy Kovac
Illustrator: Sonny Liew
ISBN: 9781423104513
Pages: 160 pages
Publisher/Date: Disney Press, an imprint of Disney Book Group, c2008.

“Seems you’ve been incriminated, bunny-rabbit. For suspicious dealings with the Alice monster…”
“But, I–“
“Monster? What’s this about?”
“While you were gone, there was an impostor here! She wrecked some of the rooms, and shot the groundskeeper out of the chimney like a pea out of a peashooter.”
“I thought she was you at first!”
“Thought she was me?”
“Well, she was a girl like you, and was wearing some sort of dress, and she had some sort of hair on her head–I don’t know! I suppose I was distracted at the time.”
“Am I that nondescript? I know I’m just a maid but…”
“Bong! Bong! Bong! Time’s up, Rabbit! Your days of favor with the Queen are over!” (21-22)

Mary Ann has just returned to Rabbit’s house when they are told by the Chesire Cat that the Queen is on her way. She’s been wrongly informed by the Tweedles that Mary Ann is “the Alice monster” who wrecked so much havoc in Wonderland. When the cat tricks Rabbit into calling the Jabberwock, Mary Ann finds herself plummeting down another hole and meeting another Queen. But will this queen be anymore helpful than the first, or has Mary Ann gotten herself into deeper trouble?

When I think of fractured tales, I think of Grimm or Andersen fairy tales and not necessarily Alice in Wonderland. But first we had this graphic novel, then Wondla, then the movie, and now there is the television series Once Upon a Time in Wonderland, and suddenly it’s become a classic. The inside jacket informs readers that this book “collects six Eisner Award-nominated chapters originally published as single-issue comics”.

Tommy Kovax and Sonny Liew prove to be a successful team. Just paging through it you realize the variety of layouts, which I think contributes to the unsteadiness of the reader. It is Wonderland after all, and you never know what you will find in this tops turvy world. We also see the political rift that Alice’s visit caused, as a back story is added involving a group that the Mad-Hatter describes as “followers [...] who call themselves “The Curious” (96). It’s lines like that and many more, along with the somewhat disjointed narrative, that harken back to the original and the Disney movie (especially the artwork) but the team makes it their own story. Readers never quite get the definitive answer they are looking for in comparing Mary Ann and Alice, who have multiple differences but even The Curious recognize that they might have an advocate in the mild-mannered maid after their original departed.

There is no author’s note that reveals how the illustrations are done or what was used, but here again there is variety. The Queen of Hearts garden scenes and the Mad Hatter’s tea party are bright and full of light. Then with literally a flip of the page in some cases, Mary Ann and her companions find themselves underground or in the Tulgey Wood, with a shadowed background and more muted browns and blues. Overall, I wonder how satisfied Mary Ann will be when she finally has a chance to return to her duties of cleaning Rabbit’s house after her adventures. Readers however should be satisfied with the tale.

Monster on the Hill

Will Eisner Week 2014Did you know it’s Will Eisner Week this week, from March 1st through March 7th? Neither did I until I stumbled upon the announcement of the celebration in January. Will Eisner Week “is an annual celebration honoring the legacy of Will Eisner and promoting sequential art, graphic novel literacy, and free speech.” Looking for more information? Visit the website. In honor of Will Eisner Week, I’m going to take this opportunity to review graphic novels, which I’ll readily admit I don’t read enough of. My third featured book will be last year’s Monster on the Hill, by Rob Harrell.

Monster on the Hill

 

 

Title: Monster on the Hill
Author/Illustrator: Rob Harrell
ISBN: 9781603090759
Pages: 185 pages
Publisher/Date: Top Shelf Productions, c2013.

“That reminds me. Who do you ‘ave watchin’ over your town while you’re here? One of the retired guys? Jimmy the Gomper?”
“Umm…”
“YOU LEFT YOUR TOWN UNMONSTERED?? ARE YOU CRAZY? The Murk senses these things, Rayburn!! He could be on his way there now! What, did you sleep through town guarding 101?”
“Actually, yes. It was dreadfully dull.”
“He Guys. Check out this rock I found! It looks just like Town Father Stevenso… What’s the matter?”
“We may have a problem.” (70-71)

Rayburn is a horrible monster, who really doesn’t venture into the neighboring 1860s English town and certainly doesn’t ravage it like he is supposed to in order to promote tourism. So a disgraced doctor and a loudmouth newsboy embarks on a journey to give him the confidence he needs. Their journey takes them away from town to visit an old friend. But while Rayburn’s gone, the town might have a real monster to worry about. It’s a race to see who gets back to town first, Rayburn who can protect the townspeople or the Murk who wants to terrorize them.

Rob Harrell’s oversized drawings really pack a punch with this story that plays on just about every genre’s stereotypes. I envision Timothy the town crier/urchin/newsboy as a distant ancestor to Loud Kiddington from the 1990s TV show Histeria!, repeatedly shouting in a cockney English that just begs the word “governor” to pass his lips (and it actually does). The distracted and disgraced doctor Charles Wilkie speaks in a prim and proper manner that brings to mind Giles from Buffy, with his stoic face accentuated by his glasses and white hair covering his head, chin, and eyebrows. When Rayburn fights a venus fly trap like plant, your guess is fulfilled when he promptly gets his head stuck in its jaws and is shaken like a rag doll, being flung up and down, at one point doing the splits across its gaping mouth before emerging triumphant and doing a victory dance mimicking an end zone dance at the Superbowl.

The energetic text is filled with exclamation points, which seem to appear on almost every page. Sound effects are thrust into the pictures comic book style, and I’m sure words like “Ka-THOOMP!” and “YEEAAUGH!” would just improve a read-aloud experience in some story-tellers capable hands. My one quibble with the story is the whole premise of cities reaching out to a monster to continually rampage a village doesn’t strike me as a smart PR move. The monsters are treated like athletes, with trading cards and toys made in their likeness. Maybe it is similar to disaster tours of volcanoes and mob scenes, or maybe it’s like the Godzilla movies where as long as it’s another city, it’s fun to cheer on the monster? All I know is that readers who enjoy those types of things will welcome this over the top addition to graphic novel collections. One idea for a curriculum connection would be to have children design a monster for their own town.

Odessa Again

Odessa AgainTitle: Odessa Again
Author: Dana Reinhardt
Narrator: Lisa Breitman
CDs/Hours: 3 CDs, 3 hours 42 minutes
ISBN: 9780449015308 (audiobook),
Pages: 196 pages
Publisher/Date: Listening Library (audiobook), Wendy Lamb Books, c2013.

Odessa flipped back a page in her journal and found the entry. She flipped to a fresh page and began to scribble furiously.
The first fall through the attic floorboards had taken her back exactly one day.
Twenty-four hours. [...]
The second fall took place on the same day as the first. [...]
And this time, her math told her, she’d landed twenty-three hours earlier. (21-22)

Odessa has just determined that the attic in the house her mither is renting has the ability to take her back in time. As a fourth grader with divorced parents and a toad for a younger brother, Odessa is excited about the opportunities this presents, such as getting out to trouble, studying for a test, and avoiding a bad haircut. But there are limits, as each time she jumps it takes her back fewer and fewer hours. What happens when Odessa runs out of time to fix the one thing she wishes she could do over?

Originally, I wasn’t a huge fan of the book, and I can’t really put my finger on why. Then I realized that I am used to active tales as opposed to more introspective novels. It encourages readers to think about what they could or would change about their day. Because of the limited and ever-shortening capability to go back, there is a lot for Odessa to consider. And because of her age, there is no possibility of changing the entire world, but rather how can we improve our own circumstances. This book would probably work better being read as opposed to listened to as an audiobook because of that self-reflection it encourages.

While the characters are vaguely developed, I enjoyed the feelings that the story evoked. Odessa’s parents respond in a realistic manner to Odessa’s antics as she tries to correct history. Odessa’s growth in the story is also admirable, as she begins to evaluate how and when she should use this temporary new-found power. For kids who like to question what-if, this would be a sci-fi light introduction to the concept of time-travel.

We’ve Got a Job

We've Got a JobTitle: We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March
Author: Cynthia Levinson
ISBN: 9781561456277
Pages: 176 pages
Publisher/Date: Peachtree Publishers, c2012
Awards: Finalist for The YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction (2013)

Though nonviolent, all of these confrontations were illegal. King reasoned that if enough protesters were arrested, they would fill the jails and overwhelm Connor’s ability to enforce segregation laws. […] Only a few hundred adults heard Bevel’s frenzied sermon that night, and just seventeen volunteered to go to jail. But kids got the message, especially when the preacher who followed Bevel proclaimed, “Some of these students say they have got to go to school, but they will get more education in five days in the City Jail than they will get in five months in a segregated school.” (48, 59)

Segregation in the 1960s was a violent time of upheaval. Most of us have heard the most familiar stories of Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks. But very few people may realize the effect that children and teens had in moving segregation efforts forward. During the entire month of April, 1963, the first in an effort to fill the jails and bring attention to the cause, only 123 people were arrested. But then a rallying cry and concentrated effort was made to enlist teenagers to a cause that would directly affect them. “Between Thursday, May 2, and Monday, May 6, almost 2,500 young people had been arrested.” (114) The treatment of these individuals, some as young as nine-years old, who flooded the streets brought national attention to events in the south. Ultimately, four children died in a church bombing that was the culmination of tensions between the black and white populations.

Cynthia Levinson spent four years tracking down and interviewing these participants and researching how history played out almost 50 years ago. Including a map, a timeline, an index, pictures of those interviewed and an assortment of notes, this book is an amazing glimpse into a time that changed America. Levinson does a thorough job of bringing to life the actions of the teenagers but also those of the adults involved. Readers finish the book with a solid understanding of how divided not only the community was on the issue of segregation, but also how disorganized the leadership was in achieving their goals. The government endorsed and encouraged the police’s prejudices against these protesters and it is hard to come to terms with their behavior based on today’s laws prohibiting such actions. At one point, government officials notified the Ku Klux Klan that they would be given 15 minutes to confront Freedom Riders, and the perpetrators who were caught after those violent fifteen minutes were given a minimal sentence.

Pair this book with The Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine, which is set a few years earlier or The Rock and the River by Kekla Magoon and One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia, which are both set a few years later. Especially in this unsteady time when unrest is reigning and emotions are high with so many political issues, including gay rights, immigration, and gun control, teens might take notes about nonviolent actions that they can use to affect change in today’s society.

This post is in honor of Nonfiction Mondays. For the entire round-up of all the bloggers who participated, check out Anastasia Suen’s blog.

This book in particular was read as I participate in YALSA’s 2013 Hub Reading Challenge which challenges readers to finish 25 books by June 22nd from a list of 83 titles that were recognized and published over the last year.

Junonia

Title: Junonia
Author: Kevin Henkes
ISBN: 9780061964183
Pages: 176 pages
Publisher/Date: Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, c2011.

“Kate has a new boyfriend with a daughter. They’re all coming. Kate called the office, and she reserved Helen Blair’s cottage.”
“That Kate,” said Alice’s father. “She’s always good for a surprise.”
“The girl is named Mallory,” Alice’s mother told them. “She’s six.” She paused. “Kate sounds happy. Oh, and his name is Ted.”
Alice blinked back tears.
Colin, Chad, and Heather. Gone.
Helen Blair. Gone.
Kate. Aunt Kate. Not gone, but nearly as awful. Coming with a boyfriend and his daughter.
Kate was the closest thing Alice had to a relative. It would be different this year. Every other year, Kate had stayed with Alice’s family in their pink cottage, sleeping on the sofa in the living room. Every other year, Alice had had Kate to herself; she hadn’t had to share her with anyone except her parents.
The doughnut turned to dirt in Alice’s mouth. (29-30)

Alice is spending her tenth birthday in Florida with her parents, just like they have for the last couple years. Looking forward to some time in the cottage they always stay at and playing with their vacation friends, Alice is frustrated by the changes that have come with their arrival. The family of three kids didn’t make it, the old couple next door seem even older than she remembered, and her “Aunt” Kate has brought her boyfriend and his six-year-old daughter Mallory. Trying to make the best of it, Alice spends her time searching the beach for a perfect example of her favorite shell, a rare junonia. Buying it from the shell shop is out of the question, because that would be cheating. But is her search just setting her up for more disappointment as she struggles to deal with all the changes?

I remember previously reading Kevin Henkes’ Protecting Marie when I was younger, but I haven’t really read a lot of his works. This kind of reminded me why, as most of the action is the internalized angst that Alice feels. She is excited about turning ten, but receives a rude awakening that she’s not the only one who is growing older or the only thing that changes with time. She faces the hard lesson that things change and most of the time you can’t stop things from changing. I don’t know how many children would enjoy the introspective nature of the novel, but it’s good to have these mixed in amongst all the action-packed fantasy and adventure novels that are so prevalent lately. I can picture this being a beach read for some young girl, slowly being savored as the tides roll in and out, creating an impetus to examine the changes approaching the reader’s own life.

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