Why We Broke UpTitle: Why We Broke Up
Author: Daniel Handler
Illustrator: Maira Kalman
Narrator: Khristine Hvam
ISBN: 9781611132960 (hardcover: 9780316127257)
Pages: 354 pages
Discs/CDs: 6 CDs (5 narration, 1 of illustrations), 6.5 hours
Publisher/Date: Hachette Audio, Little, Brown and Company, c2011.
Awards: Printz Honor Book (2012)

The thunk is the box, Ed. This is what I am leaving you. [...] Every last souvenir of the love we had, the prizes and the debris of this relationship, like the glitter in the gutter when the parade has passed, all the everything and whatnot kicked to the curb. I’m dumping the whole box back into your life, Ed, every item of you and me. I’m dumping this box on your porch, Ed, but it is you, Ed, who is getting dumped. (3-4)

They came from different cliques; Ed was the co-captain of the basketball team with ex-girlfriends at every turn while Min was the film aficionado, whom everyone called arty but she denied vehemently. Everyone questioned what they saw in each other, but they thought it would last, they thought it was different. And it was, until just over a month into their quick flare up of a relationship, when it no longer was enough, and they separated. Now, after some reflection, Min is returning Ed’s stuff. Not just the stuff he gave her, or he left behind, but all the little mementos that meant so much when they were tied to someone she loved. Told in flashbacks, this is the story of why they broke up.

I listened to this story after a break up (of sorts) of my own, and found it extremely cathartic. Khristine Hvam’s narration, provides an emotionally driven reading of this emotionally driven story. Her inflections are spot on, as Min vacillates from outrage and hurt to tender reminisces of the time they spent together, regardless of how brief it was. You might lose one or two details with the items that warrant a shorter description and go unnamed, but a disc is included for your benefit with PDFs of the illustrations. I grabbed a physical copy of the book instead, and the drawings are bright, bold, and beautiful, although the book is heavier than I anticipated it to be. Is it symbolic? Are they commenting on the weight of someone’s feelings, or did they just want it to clunk when you set it down like so many of the objects do when dropped in the box? One will never know.

Told entirely from Min’s perspective as she spills her soul in a letter to Ed that will accompany the box of stuff, Ed realistically comes across as a mystery to readers although he does have his moments. (The “I’m sorry” scene pulled at my heart-strings just a little, even though I questioned his sincerity through the whole thing.) I wanted to hug Min throughout the entire book, as she experienced heartache for the first time.

I loved the realism of the relationships, not just Min and Ed, but Min with her friends, who at first claim “no opinion” of Ed but then she learns they do in fact have their own opinions of this outsider joining their group. I’m reminded for some reason of Katy Perry’s song Hot n’ Cold, and if I made a soundtrack for this book I’d probably include it as we witness Min and Ed at all stages of their boyfriend/girlfriend status. With no mention of social media (at least not that I can remember), that little fact distorts how realistic this might seem, but without it this book might just stand the test of time. The other distorted fact is how LONG it would have really taken someone to hand write all 300+ pages of the story of their relationship, but it’s something that you really don’t dwell on. Give it to anyone suffering a broken heart and is either past or trying to get past the weepy stage. Also good for anyone who is fed up with the Nicholas Spark and Nora Roberts love stories. Bravo!

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